an Anthropology Question

Saffron
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an Anthropology Question

Post by Saffron »

Explain how variation, competition for resources, immense geologial time, and geographic isolation can all interact to result ultimately in the appearance of a new species.:-2
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chonsigirl
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Post by chonsigirl »

For animal or human species? I assume human, since you asked it for anthropology.
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Post by Clint »

Saffron wrote: Explain how variation, competition for resources, immense geologial time, and geographic isolation can all interact to result ultimately in the appearance of a new species.:-2
Poof! It's magic with a very long, debatable scientific justification.
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Post by Rapunzel »

Saffron wrote: Explain how variation, competition for resources, immense geologial time, and geographic isolation can all interact to result ultimately in the appearance of a new species.:-2


Alien interaction? :yh_alien2 :wah:
Saffron
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Post by Saffron »

chonsigirl wrote: For animal or human species? I assume human, since you asked it for anthropology.
Human or animal.
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chonsigirl
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Post by chonsigirl »

That is alot in one question.

From a scientific viewpoint:

Variation-differentiation of species over a period of time, adapting to their environmental needs.

Competition for resources-the survival of the fittest.

Immense geological time-adaptation takes place over time, whether it occurs in leaps or is slow.

Geographic isolation-gene pools become isolated due to many things, natural barriers, movement of continents, etc. Smaller species may only be adapted to a particular location/environment due to specialization over time.
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Lulu2
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Post by Lulu2 »

Human AND animal are the same thing. We ARE animal.

Are you serious about finding the answer to speciation on this planet? Because there are many easily understood books and discussions on the subject.

Given space, time and environmental pressures, millions of species have evolved, flourished and disappeared on our planet.

What is it you don't understand?
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Post by spot »

Saffron wrote: Explain how variation, competition for resources, immense geologial time, and geographic isolation can all interact to result ultimately in the appearance of a new species.:-2I've just read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speciation and that seems to cover the ground as a starter for you.
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Post by Galbally »

Saffron wrote: Explain how variation, competition for resources, immense geologial time, and geographic isolation can all interact to result ultimately in the appearance of a new species.:-2


Okay, all life on earth is based on DNA, which is a very large self-replicating molecule made up primarily of 4 amino acid bases arranged on a double helix that is comprised of cyclical carbon chains. These bases provide a blueprint for how lifeforms organize themselves and also the agent of reproduction both sexual and asexual. Sexual reproduction seems to have been invented about 2 billion years after life evolved and thats where things seem to get interesting as by sharing 2 different parent DNA strands the possibility to produce offspring that will surive longer in a given environment seems to be enhanced.

Over the long term a species will live out its life cycle in an environment like say a decidedous forest. Now the individuals in that species obviously do not change, but over long periods of time offspring that are more fit for their environment will tend to live long enough to reproduce and produce more offpring that are good at living in that environment. The ones that are not so good tend not to live as long and reproduce less, so over many many generations less fit members of a given species will die out and the surviving members will be those best at gathering resources, avoiding predators etc. Take for example a polar bear, obviously supremely adapted to living in artic conditions, grizzly's and brown bears are more suited to temperate regions and other bear species have adapted to other environments, they all share a common ancestor, but over time different bear populations gradually moved into different regions and because of the unique conditions of each regions only the offpring that had an edge over others survived, and over a long time this "natural selection" resulted in the varities of different bear species that we see. The best species to observe selection in is insects or bacteria as they have huge individual populations, short lifecycles and many generations over a relatively short period of time. Its one of the reasons why the fruitfly was used in early genetics research.
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Saffron
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Post by Saffron »

Galbally wrote: Okay, all life on earth is based on DNA, which is a very large self-replicating molecule made up primarily of 4 amino acid bases arranged on a double helix that is comprised of cyclical carbon chains. These bases provide a blueprint for how lifeforms organize themselves and also the agent of reproduction both sexual and asexual. Sexual reproduction seems to have been invented about 2 billion years after life evolved and thats where things seem to get interesting as by sharing 2 different parent DNA strands the possibility to produce offspring that will surive longer in a given environment seems to be enhanced.

Over the long term a species will live out its life cycle in an environment like say a decidedous forest. Now the individuals in that species obviously do not change, but over long periods of time offspring that are more fit for their environment will tend to live long enough to reproduce and produce more offpring that are good at living in that environment. The ones that are not so good tend not to live as long and reproduce less, so over many many generations less fit members of a given species will die out and the surviving members will be those best at gathering resources, avoiding predators etc. Take for example a polar bear, obviously supremely adapted to living in artic conditions, grizzly's and brown bears are more suited to temperate regions and other bear species have adapted to other environments, they all share a common ancestor, but over time different bear populations gradually moved into different regions and because of the unique conditions of each regions only the offpring that had an edge over others survived, and over a long time this "natural selection" resulted in the varities of different bear species that we see. The best species to observe selection in is insects or bacteria as they have huge individual populations, short lifecycles and many generations over a relatively short period of time. Its one of the reasons why the fruitfly was used in early genetics research.
thanks so much, I may use some of this in my essay. ;)
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

Galbally wrote: Okay, all life on earth is based on DNA, which is a very large self-replicating molecule made up primarily of 4 amino acid bases arranged on a double helix that is comprised of cyclical carbon chains. These bases provide a blueprint for how lifeforms organize themselves and also the agent of reproduction both sexual and asexual. Sexual reproduction seems to have been invented about 2 billion years after life evolved and thats where things seem to get interesting as by sharing 2 different parent DNA strands the possibility to produce offspring that will surive longer in a given environment seems to be enhanced.






A wonderfully erudite explanation - now if you fit the effects of mutation and the faulty copying of the DNA into it, then we can move from one species to the next.

But then, we'd end up with a text book instead of a very well presented answer.
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Galbally
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Post by Galbally »

Saffron wrote: thanks so much, I may use some of this in my essay. ;)


I'm flattered, but my advice if you are doing an essay is to look at actual educational sources on evolution and don't just take my word for it, after all I am just some random person on the Internet and I could be talking off the top of my head, I'm not mind you, but still its better to learn for yourself, you'll remember it better that way. ;)
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Saffron
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Post by Saffron »

Galbally wrote: I'm flattered, but my advice if you are doing an essay is to look at actual educational sources on evolution and don't just take my word for it, after all I am just some random person on the Internet and I could be talking off the top of my head, I'm not mind you, but still its better to learn for yourself, you'll remember it better that way. ;)
I was given about 5 extra days to work on my paper, by my professor, as I was sick on Sunday and Monday and yesterday. I have barely started writing it. But today I'm gonna get more written. I've tried to read some of Darwin's book, but the way he writes, it's like I cannot understand it. And of course the subject is not that familiar to me.

But thanks again, any other info you may have would be really helpful.


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Galbally
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Saffron wrote: I was given about 5 extra days to work on my paper, by my professor, as I was sick on Sunday and Monday and yesterday. I have barely started writing it. But today I'm gonna get more written. I've tried to read some of Darwin's book, but the way he writes, it's like I cannot understand it. And of course the subject is not that familiar to me.

But thanks again, any other info you may have would be really helpful.





The Origin of Speices is a difficult book to read alright, he was a great scientist but Darwin wasn't great at explaining his ideas to non-scientists, and after all it was written in the middle of the 19th century. I'm afraid I can't really advise you on what books to read on this as you don't have a long time and most of the recent books I have read are quite long and would probably be a bit difficult if you weren't used to the biological concepts inherenent in evolution theory. I'm sure there must be some good general textbooks or even one of those beginners guides to evolution theory (I don't mean to sound patronizing or anything, i'm just trying to give you useful advice so please don't take offence). Anyway good luck with your paper.
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Saffron
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Post by Saffron »

Galbally wrote: The Origin of Speices is a difficult book to read alright, he was a great scientist but Darwin wasn't great at explaining his ideas to non-scientists, and after all it was written in the middle of the 19th century. I'm afraid I can't really advise you on what books to read on this as you don't have a long time and most of the recent books I have read are quite long and would probably be a bit difficult if you weren't used to the biological concepts inherenent in evolution theory. I'm sure there must be some good general textbooks or even one of those beginners guides to evolution theory (I don't mean to sound patronizing or anything, i'm just trying to give you useful advice so please don't take offence). Anyway good luck with your paper.
I'm not taking offense believe me.

I see that you are in Ireland. I have lots of relatives in Ireland. I found out after my brother and sister visited there a couple years ago, that some of them live in a castle. And the others live on farms. My grandfather migrated over here to the States from Ireland. Do you live near Meathe? (Darwin even writes about that in his book). Where do you live?:)

Okay I just typed my paper and it only came to about 1 1/2 pages long, then I added my sources cited to the end of it. I try to keep my papers short and to the point. I turn it in on Monday. And we already have our 2nd quiz on Monday. This anthro stuff is killing me.:-5

Have you ever read "The Monkey in the Mirror"?


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Galbally
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Post by Galbally »

Saffron wrote: I'm not taking offense believe me.

I see that you are in Ireland. I have lots of relatives in Ireland. I found out after my brother and sister visited there a couple years ago, that some of them live in a castle. And the others live on farms. My grandfather migrated over here to the States from Ireland. Do you live near Meathe? (Darwin even writes about that in his book). Where do you live?:)

Okay I just typed my paper and it only came to about 1 1/2 pages long, then I added my sources cited to the end of it. I try to keep my papers short and to the point. I turn it in on Monday. And we already have our 2nd quiz on Monday. This anthro stuff is killing me.:-5

Have you ever read "The Monkey in the Mirror"?





Your people lived in a Castle? Why did they leave, they must have been having a great time! Unfortunatly being of peasant stock myself Castles were a bit out of my families league, I'm sure we lived in shed or something and had potatos for dinner every day in the old days. I don't live in meath, but not that far from it as its a small country Ireland. I don't really give out where I live precisely on the Internet as I just prefer a bit of mystery and its also wise to not volunteer too much information about yourself on the Internet. I can tell you though that I have been to meath plenty of times, its a very pretty county, and it has some amazing archeology, you may not know this, but the oldset intact building in the world is in Meath, its a huge place thats now called Newgrange, near the hill of Tara, and was built 5000 years ago by our distant ancestors (thats older than the great pyramids of Egypt) and it really is quite amazing and gives you goose bumps when you go near it, as its very ancient and kinda mystical, and its perfect, just like it was all those years ago.

I hope that you do Ok on your essay and good luck with that, and no I havn't read that book, but it sounds like it may be about humans and primates, or maybe its just about a monkey who likes mirrors, in any case I will keep an eye out for it.
"We are never so happy, never so unhappy, as we imagine"



Le Rochefoucauld.



"A smack in the face settles all arguments, then you can move on kid."



My dad 1986.
Saffron
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Post by Saffron »

Galbally wrote: Your people lived in a Castle? Why did they leave, they must have been having a great time!
They are still living there.

Galbally wrote:

Unfortunatly being of peasant stock myself Castles were a bit out of my families league, I'm sure we lived in shed or something and had potatos for dinner every day in the old days. I don't live in meath, but not that far from it as its a small country Ireland. I don't really give out where I live precisely on the Internet as I just prefer a bit of mystery and its also wise to not volunteer too much information about yourself on the Internet. I can tell you though that I have been to meath plenty of times, its a very pretty county, and it has some amazing archeology, you may not know this, but the oldset intact building in the world is in Meath, its a huge place thats now called Newgrange, near the hill of Tara, and was built 5000 years ago by our distant ancestors (thats older than the great pyramids of Egypt) and it really is quite amazing and gives you goose bumps when you go near it, as its very ancient and kinda mystical, and its perfect, just like it was all those years ago.
Sounds nice. My grandfather migrated here from Ireland. And he never wanted to go back, even to visit. But my brother, sister and mother have all gone there to visit relatives. I'm sure they've been to the Newgrange. And to many other places there, as well as England. A few times the relatives from the farm came here to California to visit us. I wish they'd come more often. They are very different from us. And one of the families has 13 children.

Galbally wrote:

I hope that you do Ok on your essay and good luck with that, and no I havn't read that book, but it sounds like it may be about humans and primates, or maybe its just about a monkey who likes mirrors, in any case I will keep an eye out for it.
I'll be turning in my essay tonight as well as taking a 2nd quiz on vocabulary. which reminds me, I need to go study.

bye, and thanks again.:D
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