The ship set sail...

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valerie
Posts: 7125
Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2004 12:00 pm

The ship set sail...

Post by valerie »

In 1912 the RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England, on its'

ill-fated maiden voyage.



Can you imagine the excitement and the crowds? Must have really been

something to see.



Only to sink 5 days later...
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minks
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Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 1:58 pm

The ship set sail...

Post by minks »

valerie wrote: In 1912 the RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England, on its'

ill-fated maiden voyage.



Can you imagine the excitement and the crowds? Must have really been

something to see.



Only to sink 5 days later...


Wow just shows you how quickly life can change .....
�You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.�

― Mae West
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Rapunzel
Posts: 6509
Joined: Thu May 12, 2005 5:47 pm

The ship set sail...

Post by Rapunzel »

valerie wrote: In 1912 the RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England, on its'

ill-fated maiden voyage.



Can you imagine the excitement and the crowds? Must have really been

something to see.



Only to sink 5 days later...


And the lucky seven were the ones who disembarked in Ireland before the Titanic began its ill-fated voyage across the Atlantic.........................

Father Francis Browne, an avid amateur photographer, booked the first leg of Titanic’s maiden voyage from Southampton to Queenstown and disembarked in Ireland. After that final landfall, the Titanic continued on its ill-fated voyage to New York. After the ship’s loss, Fr. Browne boarded Olympic to photograph spots where dramatic moments had unfolded on Titanic only a few weeks before.



To test manoeuvrability, Captain Smith took the Titanic through some additional practice turns en route to Queenstown (now Cobh) where she arrived just before noon on Thursday, April 11. She anchored two miles offshore, taking aboard mainly third-class passengers ferried out by tenders. Along with the tenders, some boats with merchants, who offered goods such as Irish linen, lace and souvenirs to the passengers, arrived. At Queenstown, seven passengers disembarked. One stoker managed to leave the ship, too. Evidently, he had used the Titanic to get a free ride home. At the same time, another incident happened: A stoker climbed up the ladder inside the fourth funnel, the dummy one used for ventilation only, to throw a last glance at land. Seeing his blackened, soot-covered face, some passengers claimed again that this was a "portent of doom."

At 1.30 p.m., the Titanic raised anchor for the last time and started to steam along the Irish coast. At dusk, the Irish mountains came out of sight. At that time, a piper in third class played "Erin's Lament", a sentimental air, to say good-bye to Ireland. For more than two thirds of the people aboard the ship, this was the last glimpse of land for their whole life.



Poignant quote:

"When anyone asks me how I can best describe my experience in nearly forty years at sea, I merely say, uneventful. Of course there have been winter gales, and storms and fog and the like. But in all my experience, I have never been in any accident ... or any sort worth speaking about. I have seen but one vessel in distress in all my years at sea. I never saw a wreck and never have been wrecked nor was I ever in any predicament that threatened to end in disaster of any sort. I cannot imagine any condition which would cause a ship to founder........ I cannot conceive of any vital disaster happening to this vessel. Modern shipbuilding has gone beyond that."

Edward J. Smith, 1907

Captain, RMS Titanic, 1912

Captain Smith was planning to retire after the maiden voyage of Titanic.




http://www.keyflux.com/titanic/facts.htm



http://fsmat.at/~bkabelka/titanic/part1/chapter3.htm



http://www.webtitanic.net/framemaid.html

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