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Kathy Ellen
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

It's September 4th, 2010. and it's so quiet at the beach.

Tourist are packing up and ready to go home tomorrow or early Monday.

Tonight I sat outside on my swivel chair and looked up at the sky with my port wine, little cigarillo and keen eyes. There was no one about and it was soooooo quiet and peaceful.

I sat in awe of the sky over the beach and was thrilled to see the big and little dipper, 3 satellites and Venus:-4

I'm at peace now.
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Odie
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Post by Odie »

Kathy Ellen;1331510 wrote: It's September 4th, 2010. and it's so quiet at the beach.

Tourist are packing up and ready to go home tomorrow or early Monday.

Tonight I sat outside on my swivel chair and looked up at the sky with my port wine, little cigarillo and keen eyes. There was no one about and it was soooooo quiet and peaceful.

I sat in awe of the sky over the beach and was thrilled to see the big and little dipper, 3 satellites and Venus:-4

I'm at peace now.


I had no idea you smoked cigars!

It must be great when all your tourists go home and its peaceful once again.:-6
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Kathy Ellen
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

Odie, I've smoked cigarettes since I was 13 yrs. old. Gave them up about 20 years ago. I'm still addicted to cigs and will never go back to smoking them, but I'm now at a point where I can smoke a wee cigarillo now and then. I don't smoke cigars....just a few, wee cigarillo sometimes on the weekend.

Maybe one day when we're allowed to visit Cuba, I will travel there with my niece and buy some big, fat Cuban cigars, and we'll smoke them in glee to be able to travel to Cuba once again:-6
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Post by Odie »

Kathy Ellen;1331516 wrote: Odie, I've smoked cigarettes since I was 13 yrs. old. Gave them up about 20 years ago. I'm still addicted to cigs and will never go back to smoking them, but I'm now at a point where I can smoke a wee cigarillo now and then. I don't smoke cigars....just a few, wee cigarillo sometimes on the weekend.

Maybe one day when we're allowed to visit Cuba, I will travel there with my niece and buy some big, fat Cuban cigars, and we'll smoke them in glee to be able to travel to Cuba once again:-6


I had no idea you smoked, quit and were still addicted.

I to quit for 3 years.......and went back smoking again.

I've never tried cigarello's unless those are the long thin cigars?

I've tried cigars and I just hated them.
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Kathy Ellen
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

This is a banner week for anyone living in the USA and Canada for viewing the satellites ISS and X37-B.

You can see both satellites almost everynight if you log onto ......

Spaceweather.com's Simple Satellite Tracker: International Space Station, spy satellites, Hubble Space Telescope

I saw both of them tonight. Oy vey...I get so excited seeing them glide by...Just think they're so marvelous:-6
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Post by chonsigirl »

Oh, I'm telling my students tomorrow, it will be very visible here on Saturday!
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Post by Odie »

WOW, that's so cool!:guitarist
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September 15, 2010 "Clouds, Birds, Moon and Venus"

Love this picture...very snazzy and one of my favorites!!

APOD: 2010 September 15 - Clouds, Birds, Moon, Venus



September 18th, 2010 "Opposite the Sun"

Some of the 'stars' that we see in the sky are really planets:-6

APOD: 2010 September 18 - Opposite the Sun
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Post by OpenMind »

Kathy Ellen;1333569 wrote: September 15, 2010 "Clouds, Birds, Moon and Venus"

Love this picture...very snazzy and one of my favorites!!

APOD: 2010 September 15 - Clouds, Birds, Moon, Venus



September 18th, 2010 "Opposite the Sun"

Some of the 'stars' that we see in the sky are really planets:-6

APOD: 2010 September 18 - Opposite the Sun


But most are galaxies as they were many years ago. :-6

Excellent photos.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

OpenMind;1334122 wrote: But most are galaxies as they were many years ago. :-6

Excellent photos.


They are beautiful pics, aren't they OpenMind:yh_star
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

September 20, 2010 "Aurora over Norway"

WOWZA......What a gorgeous aurora:-6

APOD: 2010 September 20 - Aurora Over Norway
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

September 21, 2010 "Starry Night over the Rhone"

Ahhhhh....Vincent:-4

YouTube - VINCENT (Jane Olivor)



Starry Night Over the Rhone

Credit: Vincent van Gogh, Wikipedia; Acknowledgement: B. Schaefer (LSU)

Explanation: How can the majesty of the night sky best be captured in a painting? This was a continual challenge for Vincent van Gogh, a famous painter in the late 1800s who pioneered stirring depictions of star filled skies into several of his works. Pictured above is van Gogh's Starry Night Over the Rhone, where the French town of Arles is depicted complete with gas lights reflecting off the Rhone river. van Gogh's night sky appears alive with turbulent stellar images contrasting with lofty dark blue hues. Above the river, one can discern the stars of the familiar Big Dipper asterism. Following a line connecting the two Big Dipper stars on the right, the North Star Polaris could be easily found, the height of which can then be estimated and actually gives the latitude where the painting was created.

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Post by Kathy Ellen »

September 22, 2010 "Discovery Rollout Shadow"

Lovely.......



APOD: 2010 September 22 - Discovery Rollout Shadow

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Post by Kathy Ellen »

Happy Equinox, harvest moon and sightings of Jupiter and Uranus:-6

Tonight | EarthSky
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Post by OpenMind »

You've been busy today, Kathy.
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Kathy Ellen
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

OpenMind;1334296 wrote: You've been busy today, Kathy.


Hi OpenMind,

:wah:Yup...trying to catch up with lost time on FG, especially my astronomy pic site:yh_star
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Post by OpenMind »

Kathy Ellen;1334298 wrote: Hi OpenMind,

:wah:Yup...trying to catch up with lost time on FG, especially my astronomy pic site:yh_star


The aurora was very good. I enjoyed the Vincent video too.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

OpenMind;1334300 wrote: The aurora was very good. I enjoyed the Vincent video too.


I agree OpenMind, I've never seen an aurora that beautiful, especially with all the activity in the sky...amazing!!!

I've enjoyed seeing a few beautiful auroras when I visited Donegal, Ireland and have enjoyed the daylight at 12 A.M.
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Post by OpenMind »

Kathy Ellen;1334302 wrote: I agree OpenMind, I've never seen an aurora that beautiful, especially with all the activity in the sky...amazing!!!

I've enjoyed seeing a few beautiful auroras when I visited Donegal, Ireland and have enjoyed the daylight at 12 A.M.


I have never been in the right place at the right time to see an aurora. Most of England is too bright at night to see much of the sky.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

OpenMind;1334303 wrote: I have never been in the right place at the right time to see an aurora. Most of England is too bright at night to see much of the sky.


That's a shame...go down to Donegal...It's so peaceful and quiet at my families home. The sky is filled with stars and many times the aurora.
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Post by OpenMind »

Kathy Ellen;1334310 wrote: That's a shame...go down to Donegal...It's so peaceful and quiet at my families home. The sky is filled with stars and many times the aurora.


One day I shall be able to go. Or I shall probably go to Scotland to see the aurora.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

OpenMind;1334312 wrote: One day I shall be able to go. Or I shall probably go to Scotland to see the aurora.


Oy vey R, please visit Donegal if you can. There's nothing like meeting a lovely Donegal person while you're watching the auroras. I don't think you'll regret it:-6
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

For the Americans on the East coast, there are 2 interesting satellites to view this week.

I'm going out tomorrow night to enjoy them.

Check out satellite flybys in your area to see if you can view them. You can download this site globally.

Spaceweather.com's Simple Satellite Tracker: International Space Station, spy satellites, Hubble Space Telescope



1. CZ-4B R/B

BRIGHTNESS: 1 (easy to see)

The R/B designation means that this is a rocket body. Chang Zheng (CZ)=Long March. On Sep. 7, 1988, the CZ-4A made its inaugural flight, successfully launching China's first experimental meteorological satellite. The CZ-4B, introduced in 1999, is an improved model with enhanced third stage and fairing. With a length of 44.1 m and a first stage thrust of 300 tons, it can launch a payload of 4,680 kg into LEO or 1,650 kg into a sun-synchronous orbit.



2. GOCE (flaring satellite)

BRIGHTNESS: 3 (dim but visible)

Europe's Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer ("GOCE" for short) is an extraordinary spacecraft. It circles the planet at a perilously low altitude using fins to cut through the wisps of Earth's outermost atmosphere. GOCE's sophisticated ion engine constantly adjusts its thrust between 1 and 20 millinewtons (mN) to counteract even the slightest hint of atmospheric drag. All this is necessary to make the finest-ever maps of Earth's gravitational field. For sky watchers, the best thing about GOCE is that it flares like a meteor when sunlight glints from its solar panels. The brightness of the flares is similar to the stars in the Big Dipper.

Here's some pictures of these satellites...The 1st one is CZ and the 2nd is GOCE...

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Post by Odie »

stunning Kathy, just stunning!:guitarist

Will you be able to get some pics tomorrow night via your telescope?
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

Odie;1334693 wrote: stunning Kathy, just stunning!:guitarist

Will you be able to get some pics tomorrow night via your telescope?


No, I only have a wee camera.....bummer...
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Post by Odie »

Kathy Ellen;1335587 wrote: No, I only have a wee camera.....bummer...


that's okay..........just sit back and enjoy.:guitarist
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Post by ZAP »

Kathy Ellen;1334258 wrote: September 20, 2010 "Aurora over Norway"

WOWZA......What a gorgeous aurora:-6

APOD: 2010 September 20 - Aurora Over Norway


Spectacularly gorgeous!!!
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

October 1st, 2010 "Zarmina's World"



APOD: 2010 October 1 - Zarmina's World



Explanation: A mere 20 light-years away in the constellation Libra, red dwarf star Gliese 581 has received much scrutiny by astronomers in recent years. Earthbound telescopes had detected the signatures of multiple planets orbiting the cool sun, two at least close to the system's habitable zone -- the region where an Earth-like planet can have liquid water on its surface. Now a team headed by Steven Vogt (UCO Lick), and Paul Butler (DTM Carnagie Inst.) has announced the detection of another planet, this one squarely in the system's habitable zone. Based on 11 years of data, their work offers a very compelling case for the first potentially habitable planet found around a very nearby star. Shown in this artist's illustration of the inner part of the exoplanetary system, the planet is designated Gliese 581g, but Vogt's more personal name is Zarmina's World, after his wife. The best fit to the data indicates the planet has a circular 37 day orbit, an orbital radius of only 0.15 AU, and a mass 3.1 times the Earth's. Modeling includes estimates of a planet radius of 1.5, and gravity at the planet's surface of 1.1 to 1.7 in Earth units. Finding a habitable planet so close by suggests there are many others in our Milky Way galaxy.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

October 2nd, 2010 "Hubble's Lagoon"

Love this picture !!!

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Post by Kathy Ellen »

Hope we're able to see this green comet:-6

See the full story here:

SpaceWeather.com -- News and information about meteor showers, solar flares, auroras, and near-Earth asteroids



APPROACHING COMET: Green comet 103P/Hartley 2 is approaching Earth for a close encounter on Oct. 20th. At that time, the comet will be only 11 million miles from Earth and should be dimly visible to the naked eye from dark sky sites. It already looks great through backyard telescopes.

Amateur astronomer Rolando Ligustri took this picture on Oct. 1st using a 14-inch Global Rent-a-Scope in New Mexico. It shows Comet Hartley beside the spectacular Pacman Nebula (NGC 281), a star-forming cloud some ten thousand light years from Earth. "This is a very nice comet for telescopes and binoculars," says Martin Gembec who took a similar picture from his backyard observatory in the Czech Republic last night. "It has a [green atmosphere] almost 0.5 degrees wide and shines like a 7th magnitude star."

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Post by ZAP »

Kathy Ellen;1336139 wrote: October 1st, 2010 "Zarmina's World"



APOD: 2010 October 1 - Zarmina's World



Explanation: A mere 20 light-years away in the constellation Libra, red dwarf star Gliese 581 has received much scrutiny by astronomers in recent years. Earthbound telescopes had detected the signatures of multiple planets orbiting the cool sun, two at least close to the system's habitable zone -- the region where an Earth-like planet can have liquid water on its surface. Now a team headed by Steven Vogt (UCO Lick), and Paul Butler (DTM Carnagie Inst.) has announced the detection of another planet, this one squarely in the system's habitable zone. Based on 11 years of data, their work offers a very compelling case for the first potentially habitable planet found around a very nearby star. Shown in this artist's illustration of the inner part of the exoplanetary system, the planet is designated Gliese 581g, but Vogt's more personal name is Zarmina's World, after his wife. The best fit to the data indicates the planet has a circular 37 day orbit, an orbital radius of only 0.15 AU, and a mass 3.1 times the Earth's. Modeling includes estimates of a planet radius of 1.5, and gravity at the planet's surface of 1.1 to 1.7 in Earth units. Finding a habitable planet so close by suggests there are many others in our Milky Way galaxy.


Isn't she beautiful? Thanks for all the wonderful pictures you post, Kathy!
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Post by Odie »

Kathy Ellen;1336142 wrote: Hope we're able to see this green comet:-6

See the full story here:

SpaceWeather.com -- News and information about meteor showers, solar flares, auroras, and near-Earth asteroids



APPROACHING COMET: Green comet 103P/Hartley 2 is approaching Earth for a close encounter on Oct. 20th. At that time, the comet will be only 11 million miles from Earth and should be dimly visible to the naked eye from dark sky sites. It already looks great through backyard telescopes.

Amateur astronomer Rolando Ligustri took this picture on Oct. 1st using a 14-inch Global Rent-a-Scope in New Mexico. It shows Comet Hartley beside the spectacular Pacman Nebula (NGC 281), a star-forming cloud some ten thousand light years from Earth. "This is a very nice comet for telescopes and binoculars," says Martin Gembec who took a similar picture from his backyard observatory in the Czech Republic last night. "It has a [green atmosphere] almost 0.5 degrees wide and shines like a 7th magnitude star."


hoping you can see it from your telescope tonight.:-6
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

October 10th, 2010 "Moonquakes Surprisingly Common"

Moonquakes Surprisingly Common

Credit: Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 Crew, GRIN, NASA

Explanation: Why are there so many moonquakes? A recent reanalysis of seismometers left on the moon by the Apollo moon landings has revealed a surprising number of moonquakes occurring within 30 kilometers of the surface. In fact, 28 moonquakes were detected in data recorded between 1972 and 1977. These moonquakes were not only strong enough to move furniture but the stiff rock of the moon continued vibrating for many minutes, significantly longer than the soft rock earthquakes on Earth. The cause of the moonquakes remains unknown, with one hypothesis holding that landslides in craters cause the vibrations. Regardless of the source, future moon buildings need to be built to withstand the frequent shakings. Pictured above in 1969, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands besides a recently deployed lunar seismometer, looking back toward the lunar landing module.

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October 13, 2010 "Hubble Museum?"

Explanation: Will the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) end up in a museum? Probably not, as when it finally goes bust, current plans call for it to be de-orbited into an ocean. But this won't stop likenesses of the famous floating observatory from appearing in science museums around the globe, sometimes paired with amazing pictures it has taken. Pictured above, in a celebration of the 20th anniversary of the launching of Hubble, a replica of the telescope was given a picturesque setting in the Italian Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti in their beautiful and historic Palazzo Loredan. The scene there appears perhaps a bit surreal as the deep space imager appears over a terrestrial tile floor, surrounded by the busts of famous thinkers, and under arches reminiscent of Escher. If you're lucky, it may even be possible to find an exhibition of Hubble images near you. And if no HST model appears there, you could always build your own.

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Post by Bryn Mawr »

Kathy Ellen;1338986 wrote: October 13, 2010 "Hubble Museum?"

Explanation: Will the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) end up in a museum? Probably not, as when it finally goes bust, current plans call for it to be de-orbited into an ocean. But this won't stop likenesses of the famous floating observatory from appearing in science museums around the globe, sometimes paired with amazing pictures it has taken. Pictured above, in a celebration of the 20th anniversary of the launching of Hubble, a replica of the telescope was given a picturesque setting in the Italian Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti in their beautiful and historic Palazzo Loredan. The scene there appears perhaps a bit surreal as the deep space imager appears over a terrestrial tile floor, surrounded by the busts of famous thinkers, and under arches reminiscent of Escher. If you're lucky, it may even be possible to find an exhibition of Hubble images near you. And if no HST model appears there, you could always build your own.


You've just scared the bejasus out of me - it cannot possibly be twenty years since they floated that thing :-3
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Kathy Ellen
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Bryn Mawr;1339016 wrote: You've just scared the bejasus out of me - it cannot possibly be twenty years since they floated that thing :-3


Hi Bryn,

Yes, it was as of June 24th, 2010. Scary stuff how time flys by, isn't it!
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Post by recovering conservative »

Is this something that doesn't work with Firefox? I'm not seeing anything!
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

recovering conservative;1339023 wrote: Is this something that doesn't work with Firefox? I'm not seeing anything!


The attached thumbnail appears happily in my Filefox
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

recovering conservative;1339023 wrote: Is this something that doesn't work with Firefox? I'm not seeing anything!


Try this link RC...btw...what name can we call you....

APOD: 2010 October 13 - Science Museum Hubble

I love your avatar...truly lovely!
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Post by recovering conservative »

Kathy Ellen;1339033 wrote: Try this link RC...btw...what name can we call you....

APOD: 2010 October 13 - Science Museum Hubble
Thanks! I tried to delete that post, because I didn't realize when I opened the thread, that I went to page 1 instead of page 39. I guess the old links from two years ago disappeared.

I love your avatar...truly lovely!


Now I wish I could remember where I got it from! I think it was probably from an Earth Day poster, and maybe it will inspire me to shift my attention away from politics and religion a bit, and start posting stuff on the really big problem of climate change.
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[QUOTE=recovering conservative;1339325]Thanks! I tried to delete that post, because I didn't realize when I opened the thread, that I went to page 1 instead of page 39. I guess the old links from two years ago disappeared.

Yes, the 1st 3 of my pictures disappeared...dunno why:(

Here was my 1st post in this thread anyhoooo....

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October 24th, 2010 "A Bucket-Wheel Excavator on Earth"

Very, cool machine!!

APOD: 2010 October 24 - A Bucket Wheel Excavator on Earth



A Bucket-Wheel Excavator on Earth

Credit & Copyright: ThyssenKrupp Technologies, SwapMeetDave

Explanation: Please wait while one of the largest mobile machines in the world crosses the road. The machine pictured above is a bucket-wheel excavator used in modern surface mining. Machines like this have given humanity the ability to mine minerals and change the face of planet Earth in new and dramatic ways. Some open pit mines, for example, are visible from orbit. The largest excavators are over 200 meters long and 100 meters high, now dwarfing the huge NASA Crawler that transports space shuttles to the launch pads. Bucket-wheel excavators can dig a hole the length of a football field to over 25 meters deep in a single day. They may take a while to cross a road, though, with a top speed under one kilometer per hour.
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Post by Kathy Ellen »

Check this marvelous machine "The Shuttle Crawler Transporter"....Oldie picture from March 4th, 2002

Explanation: NASA's Crawler-Transporters are the largest tracked vehicles in existence. Although the crawlers pack over 5,000 horsepower, their top speed is less than two kilometers per hour when fully loaded. Eleven people are needed to drive a single crawler. Diesel fuel mileage is about 350 liters per kilometer (less than 0.007 miles per gallon). The crawler's function is to move NASA's space shuttles -- complete with launch platforms -- from the Assembly Building to the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA. Two of these massive machines have operated since the Apollo era and have now crawled over 4,000 kilometers, all the while keeping their contents perfectly upright. In this picture a crawler transports the shuttle Columbia to the pad prior to its March 1st launch on the latest Hubble Space Telelescope Servicing Mission.

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Just a tad on the big side, eh?
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Post by recovering conservative »

Today's NASA picture indicates that the LCROSS and LRO missions had more success finding water than originally believed:



This is actually a picture of the Moon's south pole....from the perspective, I might have thought it was the north pole at first. The color enhancements are used to identify the areas of interest to NASA researchers looking for water on the Moon. The blue areas indicate high levels of hydrogen in the soil, that may indicate sub-surface water ice. The red areas are bone dry.

There may be rich deposits of ice below the surface; but even near the surface, one report I heard stated that the soil moisture of the areas measured is about twice the moisture level found in the sands of the Sahara Desert. That probably doesn't sound too good to most people, but the NASA spokesman said that even that level of moisture is recoverable. This is good news if the Space Program ever gets back on track, since transporting supplies from Earth is extremely expensive. A future Moon colony that had to have all of its water imported from Earth would have been a major roadblock to establishing a future settlement on the Moon.

The reason why the Moon's south pole was chosen as the likely site that might contain water is because surface water would have evaporated billions of years ago from most of the Moon's surface because of the Moon's low gravity and lack of atmosphere. The South Pole has some huge craters, with interiors that haven't seen the Sun's light for billions of years, and are only several degrees above absolute zero....so cold that water molecules could not evaporate away. Apparently much of Moon's ancient supply of water from other regions would not have drifted off into space, but was instead bouncing along the surface until it settled inside one of those giant craters -- where it has remained for millions of years.

Another intriguing feature about the Moon's south pole, is that the summits of those craters are constantly exposed to sunlight -- making them a perfect energy source once solar collectors could be set up.

APOD: 2010 October 25 - Water Ice Detected Beneath Moons Surface
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Post by recovering conservative »

Kathy Ellen;1340370 wrote: [QUOTE=recovering conservative;1339325]Thanks! I tried to delete that post, because I didn't realize when I opened the thread, that I went to page 1 instead of page 39. I guess the old links from two years ago disappeared.

Yes, the 1st 3 of my pictures disappeared...dunno why:(

Here was my 1st post in this thread anyhoooo....


Thanks again! Maybe someone decided that old pictures took up too much bandwith to maintain.
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

Kathy Ellen;1340484 wrote: October 24th, 2010 "A Bucket-Wheel Excavator on Earth"

Very, cool machine!!

APOD: 2010 October 24 - A Bucket Wheel Excavator on Earth



A Bucket-Wheel Excavator on Earth

Credit & Copyright: ThyssenKrupp Technologies, SwapMeetDave

Explanation: Please wait while one of the largest mobile machines in the world crosses the road. The machine pictured above is a bucket-wheel excavator used in modern surface mining. Machines like this have given humanity the ability to mine minerals and change the face of planet Earth in new and dramatic ways. Some open pit mines, for example, are visible from orbit. The largest excavators are over 200 meters long and 100 meters high, now dwarfing the huge NASA Crawler that transports space shuttles to the launch pads. Bucket-wheel excavators can dig a hole the length of a football field to over 25 meters deep in a single day. They may take a while to cross a road, though, with a top speed under one kilometer per hour.


I went out to see one of these crossing a main road a few years back - magnificent lump of tin but it took them quite a time to re-instate the road after it crushed the bed of it.
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Kathy Ellen
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Astronomy picture of the day...

Post by Kathy Ellen »

Bryn Mawr;1340835 wrote: I went out to see one of these crossing a main road a few years back - magnificent lump of tin but it took them quite a time to re-instate the road after it crushed the bed of it.


WOW...lucky you Bryn. I'd love to see a machine that big....It reminded me of the movie that Snowfire recommended "Moon." My jaw dropped open when I saw those gigantic mining machines. Where did you go to see such machines? How did you feel when you saw them?

Guess the machine also reminded me of my Dad. He was a sandhog in New York helping to build the water tunnel, Holland Tunnel and the Lincoln Tunnel. He worked with big machines like those all of his life. I was a girl so I couldn't go into the tunnels...only the boys in the family were allowed to view these marvels:thinking::wah:
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Kathy Ellen
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Astronomy picture of the day...

Post by Kathy Ellen »

recovering conservative;1340726 wrote: Today's NASA picture indicates that the LCROSS and LRO missions had more success finding water than originally believed:

This is actually a picture of the Moon's south pole....from the perspective, I might have thought it was the north pole at first. The color enhancements are used to identify the areas of interest to NASA researchers looking for water on the Moon. The blue areas indicate high levels of hydrogen in the soil, that may indicate sub-surface water ice. The red areas are bone dry.


WOW, thanks for the info RC. Maybe Earth people will live on the moon one day. Jeez, we've already left gargage there. We should go back and clean it up:wah:
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Bryn Mawr
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Astronomy picture of the day...

Post by Bryn Mawr »

Kathy Ellen;1340843 wrote: WOW...lucky you Bryn. I'd love to see a machine that big....It reminded me of the movie that Snowfire recommended "Moon." My jaw dropped open when I saw those gigantic mining machines. Where did you go to see such machines? How did you feel when you saw them?

Guess the machine also reminded me of my Dad. He was a sandhog in New York helping to build the water tunnel, Holland Tunnel and the Lincoln Tunnel. He worked with big machines like those all of his life. I was a girl so I couldn't go into the tunnels...only the boys in the family were allowed to view these marvels:thinking::wah:


This was about fifteen miles due east of where I lived and the machine was walking about forty miles south from one quarry to another across the main Leicester to Peterborough road - awesome.

To see such a lump made you appreciate that we are literally capable of moving mountains but then you sit and think about it and realise that, at the end of the day, that's still only scratching the surface.

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