Genealogy stuff

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LarsMac
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Post by LarsMac »

So, My uncle had been working out our family genealogy for some time. After his passing, his documentation landed in my lap, because I had also been handed my maternal family docs.

So, finally, I started looking through it all.

On another note, my wife, whose surname was the same as mine, and I had always been curious if we were related back in the past.

We both participated recently in the National Geographic "Genographic" project.

We got our DNA results recently and I found a site where you can match your DNA against other folks. It turns out that we share no common DNA. Or at least not enough to show a relationship.

I started looking through a couple of ancestry sites, and checking out our family trees. Turns out that back in the 16th century, while our male ancestors were not related, they were neighbors. Her original American ancestor moved to the Massachusetts colony from Kingsbridge, Devon, while mine, in a similar time period came to Massachusetts from Bridgewater, Somerset.

I suppose that in those days, that may not have been quite as neighborly a relationship as it might be today, given that travel from Kingsbridge to Bridgewater may have taken a bit longer in those days.

But, now I am curious what resources might be available to research further back and track the families further back.
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Post by gmc »

When did your ancestors move to america? I'm curious if they wre on the wrong side in the english civil war civil war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgwater

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Post by Bryn Mawr »

gmc;1494546 wrote: When did your ancestors move to america? I'm curious if they wre on the wrong side in the english civil war civil war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgwater

Kingsbridge | Devon Guide


Not if they moved in the sixteenth century - but that is remarkably early.
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Post by LarsMac »

gmc;1494546 wrote: When did your ancestors move to america? I'm curious if they wre on the wrong side in the english civil war civil war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgwater

Kingsbridge | Devon Guide


After some further digging, it turns out, that both my wife's and my ancestors noted earlier were brothers. They and their families, including parents all went to Massachusetts together in the early 17th century. some time around 1640. They were Protestants so the political events of that period may have been a reason for the move.
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Post by gmc »

LarsMac;1494552 wrote: After some further digging, it turns out, that both my wife's and my ancestors noted earlier were brothers. They and their families, including parents all went to Massachusetts together in the early 17th century. some time around 1640. They were Protestants so the political events of that period may have been a reason for the move.


That's what I thought - the clue is in boston massachusetts. which kind of protestant were they? odds are they were puritans.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puritan_m ... 80%9340%29

From 1630 through 1640 approximately 20,000 colonists came to New England.[4] The 'Great Migration' 1629–40 saw 80,000 people leave England, roughly 20,000 migrating to each of four destinations, Ireland, New England, the West Indies and the Netherlands. The immigrants to New England came from every English county except Westmorland, nearly half from Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex.[5] The distinction drawn is that the movement of colonists to New England was not predominantly male, but of families with some education, leading relatively prosperous lives.[1] Winthrop's noted words, a City upon a Hill, refer to a vision of a new society, not just economic opportunity.




The english civil war. It's an era whose conflicts echo down to the present day both here and in the US.

For really I think that the poorest hee that is in England hath a life to live, as the greatest hee; and therefore truly, Sr, I think itt clear, that every Man that is to live under a Government ought first by his own Consent to put himself under that Government; and I do think that the poorest man in England is not at all bound in a strict sense to that Government that he hath not had a voice to put Himself under. ”

— Putney Debates record book 1647, Worcester College, Oxford, MS 65. Spelling and capitalisation as in the original manuscript.




Sound vaguely familiar?

Your ancestors must have been amongst those at the heart of the politucal upheaval of the time.
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Post by LarsMac »

gmc;1494553 wrote: That's what I thought - the clue is in boston massachusetts. which kind of protestant were they? odds are they were puritans.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puritan_m ... 80%9340%29



The english civil war. It's an era whose conflicts echo down to the present day both here and in the US.



Sound vaguely familiar?

Your ancestors must have been amongst those at the heart of the politucal upheaval of the time.


Or amongst those at the brunt of it. Depending on who was in charge at the time.
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Post by FourPart »

I'm a direct descendant of James Brine, of Tolpuddle Martyrs fame (first ever Trade Union). Perhaps that explains my Socialist leanings.
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Post by spot »

The way back from where you've reached will be the index of the National Archives. They cover a large part of what remains from around 1400. If your litigious government-employed property-owning ancestors were noticed by officialdom they might get a mention there.

https://www.archives.gov/research/genealogy/
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Post by Mark Aspam »

On my father's side, I am the fourth cousin, thrice removed, of William George Fargo, founder of Wells-Fargo, former president of American Express, and former mayor of Buffalo, New York.

On my mother's side, I'm descended from several generations of Catholics, preceded by Lord knows how many generations of Jews.

That's why I'm so confused.
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Post by LarsMac »

So far, I've found relatives from Devon, England - Limerick, Ireland - Lanark region of Scotland and Hesse, Germany. The German appears to have been a mercenary for the Brits in the 1770-1780s who decided to stay around Virginia after Cornwallis went home. Rumor has it that all the Hessian mercs were told they had to find their own way home after the fall of Yorktown. The Scot came over in the latter 1800s, to join the Mormons in Utah. The guy from Devon was definitely with the Puritans coming over after the Plymouth colony proved viable. and the Irish ancestor came to take a land grant in Pennsylvania in the latter 1600s. Those make up a the four paternal lines of my grandparents.

One a little further up the line came to Louisiana from Acadia after "Le Grand Derangement" following the 7 Years War.

I found a few whose records were lost somewhere. They "just appear", with no history, whatsoever.

So as suspected, it seems that I, like many Americans, am a simple Mongrel.
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Post by ZAP »

"So as suspected, it seems that I, like many Americans, am a simple Mongrel."

Certainly not simple!
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

LarsMac;1494625 wrote: So far, I've found relatives from Devon, England - Limerick, Ireland - Lanark region of Scotland and Hesse, Germany. The German appears to have been a mercenary for the Brits in the 1770-1780s who decided to stay around Virginia after Cornwallis went home. Rumor has it that all the Hessian mercs were told they had to find their own way home after the fall of Yorktown. The Scot came over in the latter 1800s, to join the Mormons in Utah. The guy from Devon was definitely with the Puritans coming over after the Plymouth colony proved viable. and the Irish ancestor came to take a land grant in Pennsylvania in the latter 1600s. Those make up a the four paternal lines of my grandparents.

One a little further up the line came to Louisiana from Acadia after "Le Grand Derangement" following the 7 Years War.

I found a few whose records were lost somewhere. They "just appear", with no history, whatsoever.

So as suspected, it seems that I, like many Americans, am a simple Mongrel.


Or, as we'd call it round here, a Heinz :-)
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Post by gmc »

Mongrels tend to have more character, be more intelligent and healthier than inbred pedigrees so I wouldn't be too upset. Funnily enough I've been in lanark on a few occasions recently both for work and to see the falls of clyde - ever now and then they shut off the hydro electric scheme and the falls flow full force.

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Post by LarsMac »

gmc;1494637 wrote: Mongrels tend to have more character, be more intelligent and healthier than inbred pedigrees so I wouldn't be too upset. Funnily enough I've been in lanark on a few occasions recently both for work and to see the falls of clyde - ever now and then they shut off the hydro electric scheme and the falls flow full force.




I was once run out of the Officer's Club at Walter Reed Medical Center for basically saying that very thing to the wife of some Major. She seemed to object rather harshly to the suggestion that she was not of a pure Boston Pedigree.

That looks like a nice area. I may have to make a point of visiting there if/when I make another trip to the UK
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Post by spot »

Cold, Lanark.
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Post by ZAP »

This thread has prompted me to study the genealogy book that my dad's cousin put together about 30 years ago and my brother has researched since. It contained information that ancestors included the mother of Jakob Fugger, ship builders from Germany, a Cherokee on The Trail Of Tears, the second wife of Davy Crockett, a horse thief, and the right-hand man of Robert E. Lee, which has a town in Florida and a fort named for him. But I had never researched some of the ancestral names such as Ruby:

"This very interesting surname, recorded in Church Registers of England, Ireland, France and Germany under the variant spellings Rouby, Roubay, Ruby, Rubi, Rubee and Ro(e)by, has two primary sources, each with its own history and derivation. Firstly, Rubie may be of Old French origin, and a locational name from Roubaix in Nord, France, initially recorded as "de Roubaix" in the late 14th Century"

Read more: Surname Database: Ruby Last Name Origin

And Tweedy:

"This is a famous Scottish territorial surname, although well recorded in Ireland. Recorded in the spellings of Tweedie, Tweedy, Twiddy, and even Tweekie, the name derives from the lands of Tweedie in the parish of Stonehouse (Lanarkshire). Legend has it that the first of the name holders was the child of a water spirit residing in the River Tweed, which is a nice story but somewhat out of keeping with the public perception of the clan members. Throughout the Middle Ages and even into the 17th century, the tribe were renowned for being a savage race, much given to the inter-tribal warfare which raged in Scotland and the English Borders from the beginning of recorded history"

Read more: Surname Database: Tweedy Last Name Origin
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Post by FourPart »

Unfortunately I only have genealogical records down my Paternal Grandmother's side, as my Paternal Grandfather was the adopted illegitimate offspring of a brother & sister, of whom we have no record. My Grandmother started tracing her Family Tree back in the 70s, when "Roots" was running, and it was the fad of the time. However, when the series came to a close & the novelty wore off with everyone else, she carried on. After she passed away, my cousin took over the task. Another family member was also Benjamin Britten, which might explain the tendency towards Music, as well as the Autism / Aspergers, which is a genetic condition.
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Post by ZAP »

My ancestors were English, Irish, German, Dutch, Scots, Welsh, Hungarian and Indian, (2 tribes, Cherokee and another) Most of the info that I have is from the research done on my father's side. Of my mother's ancestors very little is known except that they were pioneers, farmers, horse lovers, excellent cooks and musicians. My mother's father or grandfather went to school with Jesse & Frank James and she had stories to tell about that family.

On my dad's side there are a lot of court documents such as deeds & patents which are interesting to read because of the language of the day, newspaper articles, two of which tell differing accounts of the hanged horse thief. Those ancestors came to America on a ship out of Hanover, Germany. Some went to Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and on west. Some went out with Daniel Boone's 2nd party on the western trek. One of the women was on the Trail Of Tears. My mother told me my grandmother got a letter telling her if she went to Oklahoma she could prove up on the land grant. She didn't have any money to go so I say Oklahoma owes me!
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Post by gmc »

Posted by zap

And Tweedy:

"This is a famous Scottish territorial surname, although well recorded in Ireland. Recorded in the spellings of Tweedie, Tweedy, Twiddy, and even Tweekie, the name derives from the lands of Tweedie in the parish of Stonehouse (Lanarkshire). Legend has it that the first of the name holders was the child of a water spirit residing in the River Tweed, which is a nice story but somewhat out of keeping with the public perception of the clan members. Throughout the Middle Ages and even into the 17th century, the tribe were renowned for being a savage race, much given to the inter-tribal warfare which raged in Scotland and the English Borders from the beginning of recorded history"

Read more: Surname Database: Tweedy Last Name Origin


An area much fought over strathclyde british, picts, saxons viking and later normans (where the name ruby probably originates) The british were noted cavalry warriors as were the border reivers it has been suggested that the origins of the king arthur legend cones from stories about a cavalry warlord in that area holdingb out against all the various invaders that piled in after the fall of rome. if you wahnt to know why so many names appear in both ireland and scotland bear in mind the scots invaded from ireland in the first place but also if you look at the ulster plantation and where most of the scots that were settled came from it makes more sense.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantation_of_Ulster

Despite the fact that Scottish Presbyterians strongly supported the Williamites in the Williamite war in Ireland in the 1690s, they were excluded from power in the postwar settlement by the Anglican Protestant Ascendancy. During the 18th century, rising Scots resentment over religious, political and economic issues fueled their emigration to the American colonies, beginning in 1717 and continuing up to the 1770s. Scots-Irish from Ulster and Scotland, and British from the borders region comprised the most numerous group of immigrants from Great Britain and Ireland to the colonies in the years before the American Revolution. An estimated 150,000 left northern Ireland. They settled first mostly in Pennsylvania and western Virginia, from where they moved southwest into the backcountry of upland territories in the South, the Ozarks and the Appalachian Mountains.[59]


Scots/irish have played a big role in the forming of america.

President george washington

If all else fails, I will retreat up the valley of Virginia, plant my flag on the Blue Ridge, rally around the Scotch-Irish of that region and make my last stand for liberty amongst a people who will never submit to tyranny whilst there is a man left to draw a trigger.'
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Post by ZAP »

gmc;1494699 wrote: Posted by zap



An area much fought over strathclyde british, picts, saxons viking and later normans (where the name ruby probably originates) The british were noted cavalry warriors as were the border reivers it has been suggested that the origins of the king arthur legend cones from stories about a cavalry warlord in that area holdingb out against all the various invaders that piled in after the fall of rome. if you wahnt to know why so many names appear in both ireland and scotland bear in mind the scots invaded from ireland in the first place but also if you look at the ulster plantation and where most of the scots that were settled came from it makes more sense.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantation_of_Ulster



Scots/irish have played a big role in the forming of america.

President george washington


Thanks for that very enlightening information!
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Post by gmc »

ZAP;1494701 wrote: Thanks for that very enlightening information!


My pleasure, I find this kind of stuff endlessly fascinating it always amazes me how everythng is interconnected.
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Post by ZAP »

gmc;1494702 wrote: My pleasure, I find this kind of stuff endlessly fascinating it always amazes me how everythng is interconnected.


Hey! What happened to the "mistletoe" and "Christmas tree" jazz that was in my e-mail notification? And the thanking my pagan ancestors? I guess I can thank them for my extremely combative/competitive nature in everything I do, also.

If one goes a step farther and delves into past-life regression and you believe it, you can really be amazed. We should have a thread on that sort of thing, or do we already?
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Post by ZAP »

gmc;1494702 wrote: My pleasure, I find this kind of stuff endlessly fascinating it always amazes me how everythng is interconnected.


I agree.
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Post by gmc »

ZAP;1494704 wrote: Hey! What happened to the "mistletoe" and "Christmas tree" jazz that was in my e-mail notification? And the thanking my pagan ancestors? I guess I can thank them for my extremely combative/competitive nature in everything I do, also.

If one goes a step farther and delves into past-life regression and you believe it, you can really be amazed. We should have a thread on that sort of thing, or do we already?


I edited and took it out as I decided it wasn't really relevant. The miseltoe and holly come from celtic/ north european tradition the decorating tne tree is a german tradition imported in to the UK both by the hanoverians and by british troops fighting in germany who brought the tradition back with them as well. Winter solstice british troops partying with german allies you can just imagine them all getting pissed together. Since you're german scots irish with bits from all over it seemed relevant and then I thought about it and decided no.
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Post by ZAP »

gmc;1494737 wrote: I edited and took it out as I decided it wasn't really relevant. The miseltoe and holly come from celtic/ north european tradition the decorating tne tree is a german tradition imported in to the UK both by the hanoverians and by british troops fighting in germany who brought the tradition back with them as well. Winter solstice british troops partying with german allies you can just imagine them all getting pissed together. Since you're german scots irish with bits from all over it seemed relevant and then I thought about it and decided no.


Thanks for the post. It's very interesting to me. I had to look up Hanoverians and found more fascinating bits to tuck away in my Trivia vault. My first ancestors who came to this country, that is if you believe that the Native Americans were here from Day One and don't count, were from Hanover.
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

ZAP;1494742 wrote: Thanks for the post. It's very interesting to me. I had to look up Hanoverians and found more fascinating bits to tuck away in my Trivia vault. My first ancestors who came to this country, that is if you believe that the Native Americans were here from Day One and don't count, were from Hanover.


Ah, but is "Day One" twelve, twenty or thirty thousand years ago?
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Post by ZAP »

Bryn Mawr;1494744 wrote: Ah, but is "Day One" twelve, twenty or thirty thousand years ago?


Or . . ."For millions of years all humans, early and modern alike, had to find their own food. They spent a large part of each day gathering plants and hunting or scavenging animals. By 164,000 years ago modern humans were collecting and cooking shellfish and by 90,000 years ago modern humans had begun making special fishing tools. Then, within just the past 12,000 years, our species, Homo sapiens, made the transition to producing food and changing our surroundings. Humans found they could control the growth and breeding of certain plants and animals. This discovery led to farming and herding animals, activities that transformed Earth’s natural landscapes—first locally, then globally. As humans invested more time in producing food, they settled down. Villages became towns, and towns became cities. With more food available, the human population began to increase dramatically. Our species had been so successful that it has inadvertently created a turning point in the history of life on Earth."



Homo sapiens | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program

This talks about millions of years, 164,000 years, 90,000 years, 12,000 years.
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

ZAP;1494747 wrote: Or . . ."For millions of years all humans, early and modern alike, had to find their own food. They spent a large part of each day gathering plants and hunting or scavenging animals. By 164,000 years ago modern humans were collecting and cooking shellfish and by 90,000 years ago modern humans had begun making special fishing tools. Then, within just the past 12,000 years, our species, Homo sapiens, made the transition to producing food and changing our surroundings. Humans found they could control the growth and breeding of certain plants and animals. This discovery led to farming and herding animals, activities that transformed Earth’s natural landscapes—first locally, then globally. As humans invested more time in producing food, they settled down. Villages became towns, and towns became cities. With more food available, the human population began to increase dramatically. Our species had been so successful that it has inadvertently created a turning point in the history of life on Earth."



Homo sapiens | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program

This talks about millions of years, 164,000 years, 90,000 years, 12,000 years.


I was talking about your Native American ancestors - the "accepted" theory is that they came across the land bridge from Asia twelve thousand years ago at the end of the last ice age but recently sites have been found in southeastern USA and in Central and South America that are being dated to twenty or even thirty thousand years ago at the beginning of the last ice age - it's still controversial stuff, especially as some of the artefacts in southeastern USA relate to items found in the Iberian peninsula rather than from Asia.
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Post by ZAP »

Bryn Mawr;1494748 wrote: I was talking about your Native American ancestors - the "accepted" theory is that they came across the land bridge from Asia twelve thousand years ago at the end of the last ice age but recently sites have been found in southeastern USA and in Central and South America that are being dated to twenty or even thirty thousand years ago at the beginning of the last ice age - it's still controversial stuff, especially as some of the artefacts in southeastern USA relate to items found in the Iberian peninsula rather than from Asia.


Oh, I'm sorry, of course that's what you were referring to.
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

ZAP;1494750 wrote: Oh, I'm sorry, of course that's what you were referring to.


Oh alas and alack, I'm so tragically misunderstood - Cassandra was no worse :) :p :)
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Post by gmc »

Bryn Mawr;1494753 wrote: Oh alas and alack, I'm so tragically misunderstood - Cassandra was no worse :) :p :)


That's cos you're welsh.:sneaky:
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

gmc;1494755 wrote: That's cos you're welsh.:sneaky:


Aye, well that's another story
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Post by ZAP »

Bryn Mawr;1494753 wrote: Oh alas and alack, I'm so tragically misunderstood - Cassandra was no worse :) :p :)


Yes, well that is the cross that one of superior intellect and prophecy must bear. So pathetic!
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

ZAP;1494761 wrote: Yes, well that is the cross that one of superior intellect and prophecy must bear. So pathetic!


But Pathos is my middle name don'ca know :-)
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Post by LarsMac »

So, an update on my digging.

The two guys I traced back to England, who I thought were brothers, may not be. Or they may be half-brothers. Seems they share some fairly common names. I have these guys named Samuel and ralph, who at first I may have thought were brothers, but then their dad George, whose father was Ralph seems to have had three different wives, and his dad, Ralph had 2 wives. But then I find that William may have been married to both wives at nearly the same time. And George seems to have married the same woman 3 times, and has three different birthdays. though the year of his death seems consistent.He may have been born in three different villages, as well. And died in either Massachusetts, or Connecticut, or maybe even Rhode Island.

And of course different people seem to have injected a knighthood into the scene.

It seems I need to do a lot more digging to sort this out.

There must have been a number of Ralphs, and Georges, and women named Anna running about Devon and Dorchester in those days. But then then they all packed up and moved to Massachusetts about the same time. And all seemed to have sons name Thomas and Ralph and Samuel.

I am very confused.
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Post by ZAP »

Bryn Mawr;1494763 wrote: But Pathos is my middle name don'ca know :-)


Were you named for one of the Three Musketeers? Arthos . . .uh . . . oh I see . . . . POrthos, never mind.
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

ZAP;1494768 wrote: Were you named for one of the Three Musketeers? Arthos . . .uh . . . oh I see . . . . POrthos, never mind.


But they were all for one and one for all and no-one has ever been for me
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Post by ZAP »

LarsMac;1494766 wrote: So, an update on my digging.

The two guys I traced back to England, who I thought were brothers, may not be. Or they may be half-brothers. Seems they share some fairly common names. I have these guys named Samuel and ralph, who at first I may have thought were brothers, but then their dad George, whose father was Ralph seems to have had three different wives, and his dad, Ralph had 2 wives. But then I find that William may have been married to both wives at nearly the same time. And George seems to have married the same woman 3 times, and has three different birthdays. though the year of his death seems consistent.He may have been born in three different villages, as well. And died in either Massachusetts, or Connecticut, or maybe even Rhode Island.

And of course different people seem to have injected a knighthood into the scene.

It seems I need to do a lot more digging to sort this out.

There must have been a number of Ralphs, and Georges, and women named Anna running about Devon and Dorchester in those days. But then then they all packed up and moved to Massachusetts about the same time. And all seemed to have sons name Thomas and Ralph and Samuel.

I am very confused.


Well, that is just about the most confusing thing I ever heard of, but it sounds strangely familiar, all that running around, getting married, dying hither, thither or yon. It's probably just as well that they packed up and left before they got kicked out for being strange. Just in case George ended his days (and any of his wives as well) in Massachusetts:
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Post by ZAP »

Couldn't post this above.

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FourPart
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Post by FourPart »

gmc;1494737 wrote: I edited and took it out as I decided it wasn't really relevant. The miseltoe and holly come from celtic/ north european tradition the decorating tne tree is a german tradition imported in to the UK both by the hanoverians and by british troops fighting in germany who brought the tradition back with them as well. Winter solstice british troops partying with german allies you can just imagine them all getting pissed together. Since you're german scots irish with bits from all over it seemed relevant and then I thought about it and decided no.
The tradition of dressing the [Christmas] Tree goes far beyond the Germans. As most Religious festivals it has its origins in Pagan culture.



All about the Christmas tree: Pagan origins, Christian adaptation and secular status
gmc
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Post by gmc »

FourPart;1494782 wrote: The tradition of dressing the [Christmas] Tree goes far beyond the Germans. As most Religious festivals it has its origins in Pagan culture.



All about the Christmas tree: Pagan origins, Christian adaptation and secular status


I know it does I was trying to keep off religion, mind you it's difficult whn youl;re talking about puritans emigrating to the colonies. Allegedly in ancient times rather than tinsel it was the entrails of animals slaughtered that were draped over the trees, when dried they glow white not that I've ever actually seen tghis phenomenon for myself.

The English Puritans condemned a number of customs associated with Christmas, such as the use of the Yule log, holly, mistletoe, etc. Oliver Cromwell preached against "the heathen traditions" of Christmas carols, decorated trees and any joyful expression that desecrated "that sacred event." 2,4




Now their descendants lament the commercialisation of christmas.

posted by lars

So, an update on my digging.

The two guys I traced back to England, who I thought were brothers, may not be. Or they may be half-brothers. Seems they share some fairly common names. I have these guys named Samuel and ralph, who at first I may have thought were brothers, but then their dad George, whose father was Ralph seems to have had three different wives, and his dad, Ralph had 2 wives. But then I find that William may have been married to both wives at nearly the same time. And George seems to have married the same woman 3 times, and has three different birthdays. though the year of his death seems consistent.He may have been born in three different villages, as well. And died in either Massachusetts, or Connecticut, or maybe even Rhode Island.






The use of the same first name, father to son, was was rather prevalent some of the sects' new members would change to biblical names when they converted widowers and widows with young children would have remarried meaning the woman would have changed her name makes tracking individuals that much harder. Gets interesting when you start digging.
ZAP
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Post by ZAP »

Ewww! Entrails of slaughtered animals that glowed white! I wonder if my grandmother Quinn ever thought of that while she was living in a covered wagon, in sub-zero temperatures, in Western Kansas until she was 8 months pregnant? Nah, she wouldn't have had room for a tree and probably would have needed it for firewood anyway.
gmc
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Post by gmc »

i think you need a cold northern climate short days and bugger all else to do to find that kind of thing amusing. It's like golf how bored tdo you have to be to find hitting stones (balls) in to rabbit holes (holes) entertaining. lots of rabbit holes on the beach and once you've been for a paddle and had an ice cream there is not much else to do in st andrews (the home of golf) trust me on that I was born there.
ZAP
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Post by ZAP »

gmc;1494822 wrote: i think you need a cold northern climate short days and bugger all else to do to find that kind of thing amusing. It's like golf how bored tdo you have to be to find hitting stones (balls) in to rabbit holes (holes) entertaining. lots of rabbit holes on the beach and once you've been for a paddle and had an ice cream there is not much else to do in st andrews (the home of golf) trust me on that I was born there.


I passed by St. Andrews on one of our guided day trips (maybe Loch Ness?) and it looked pretty bleak compared to our courses here in the US. I wasn't able to stop there, although I wanted to. I did, however, get a little container of golf tees, different lovely colors of yellow, orange, lavender, green and pink, that have "Harrods" imprinted on each one. I still have 35 left out of the 50 that cost L4.95 I was quite impressed with Harrods and thought the prices were reasonable.
gmc
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Post by gmc »

ZAP;1494826 wrote: I passed by St. Andrews on one of our guided day trips (maybe Loch Ness?) and it looked pretty bleak compared to our courses here in the US. I wasn't able to stop there, although I wanted to. I did, however, get a little container of golf tees, different lovely colors of yellow, orange, lavender, green and pink, that have "Harrods" imprinted on each one. I still have 35 left out of the 50 that cost L4.95 I was quite impressed with Harrods and thought the prices were reasonable.


What was it overcast and raining or just overcast and going to rain later? :yh_rotfl you're not supposed to enjoy golf it's punishment for you trying to enjoy yourself. The best time to visit scotland is at the end of june when the days are at their longest.
ZAP
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Post by ZAP »

We took the train up from London to Glasgow and it was sunny all day. :-6 This was in August. Then it rained the next 2 days off and on all through our sightseeing. :-2 The following day was beautiful in Glasgow for the bagpipe competition and then we left to go back to London, where it was sunny. Our 2 week trip included England, Ireland, Norway, Iceland and Scotland. The 2 days in Scotland were the only rainy days---hmm. :wah:
ZAP
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Post by ZAP »

I'm watching a documentary about Davy Crockett and it just mentioned his marriage to Elizabeth Patton, an ancestor of mine, and at least one other member here in FG.
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LarsMac
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Post by LarsMac »

ZAP;1495203 wrote: I'm watching a documentary about Davy Crockett and it just mentioned his marriage to Elizabeth Patton, an ancestor of mine, and at least one other member here in FG.


Her niece was a my grandfather's grandmother.
Control is an illusion. The Chaos is all part of the fun.
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ZAP
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Post by ZAP »

My daughter, the microbiologist, on the suggestion of her daughter, the nurse, gave me an Ancestry.com DNA testing kit for Mother's Day. I just finished spitting into a test tube with stabilizing fluid, sealing it and am taking it to the post office. In 6-8 weeks maybe I'll find out which other Native American tribe is in my ancestry.
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spot
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Post by spot »

You may find yourself outed as a long-term pure-bred Russian sleeper agent. That would put the cat among the pigeons.
Nullius in verba|||||||||||
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