Any Gardner's here?..

Discuss growing vegetables, fruits, and herbs.
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Oscar Namechange
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Oscar Namechange »

I welcome all opinions and suggestions.

I have very little time for the garden these days. My husband grows vegetables on the patio around the back but the front and sides became neglected.

This week, we brought someone In to clear the lot so we could start from scratch leaving certain tree's and bushes that attract a wide variety of birds.

I need hardy bushes and shrubs that need very little hands on work that meet the following:

Fox Proof

Terrier Dog Proof

Will survive a British winter

Provide berries or seeds for the birds

Non poisonous to cats

Will not grow above 4 or 5 foot high

Any Idea's will be most appreciated:

Thankyou
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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Bryn Mawr
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Bryn Mawr »

Pyrocantha should meet all your criteria
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Oscar Namechange
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Oscar Namechange »

Bryn Mawr;1365404 wrote: Pyrocantha should meet all your criteria
Thanks Bryn.

We already have 3 In the garden. As you know, they are a great source of berries but also the sparrows take roost In the larger one because the thorns give them protection from the Sparrow Hawks.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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Bryn Mawr
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Bryn Mawr »

oscar;1365407 wrote: Thanks Bryn.

We already have 3 In the garden. As you know, they are a great source of berries but also the sparrows take roost In the larger one because the thorns give them protection from the Sparrow Hawks.


Generally dog and fox proof and definitely very little hands on work.
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Lon
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Lon »

oscar;1365403 wrote: I welcome all opinions and suggestions.

I have very little time for the garden these days. My husband grows vegetables on the patio around the back but the front and sides became neglected.

This week, we brought someone In to clear the lot so we could start from scratch leaving certain tree's and bushes that attract a wide variety of birds.

I need hardy bushes and shrubs that need very little hands on work that meet the following:

Fox Proof

Terrier Dog Proof

Will survive a British winter

Provide berries or seeds for the birds

Non poisonous to cats

Will not grow above 4 or 5 foot high

Any Idea's will be most appreciated:

Thankyou


There is a wide variety of CACTI and they are guaranteed to be animal proof. :wah:



Growing Cold Climate Cacti
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Oscar Namechange
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Oscar Namechange »

Lon;1365421 wrote: There is a wide variety of CACTI and they are guaranteed to be animal proof. :wah:



Growing Cold Climate Cacti
Hey, I never thought of Cacti. Good Idea Lon. I will have to check weather they will survive British winters but worth looking Into... Thanks.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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Odie
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Odie »

oscar;1365403 wrote: I welcome all opinions and suggestions.

I have very little time for the garden these days. My husband grows vegetables on the patio around the back but the front and sides became neglected.

This week, we brought someone In to clear the lot so we could start from scratch leaving certain tree's and bushes that attract a wide variety of birds.

I need hardy bushes and shrubs that need very little hands on work that meet the following:

Fox Proof

Terrier Dog Proof

Will survive a British winter

Provide berries or seeds for the birds

Non poisonous to cats

Will not grow above 4 or 5 foot high

Any Idea's will be most appreciated:

Thankyou




this should help you oscar.



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Life is just to short for drama.
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Oscar Namechange
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Oscar Namechange »

Thank You Odie, I will look Into your link.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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Odie
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Post by Odie »

oscar;1365486 wrote: Thank You Odie, I will look Into your link.


your welcome, it's all bushes for the UK, enjoy and let me know which ones you decide on.
Life is just to short for drama.
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YZGI
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by YZGI »

Cement seems to fit the bill.
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Oscar Namechange
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

YZGI;1365616 wrote: Cement seems to fit the bill.
Look, my husband got his own way once with cement after an arguement that nearly sent us Into the divorce courts. That's why the cemented rear garden is HIS garden.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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YZGI
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Post by YZGI »

oscar;1365654 wrote: Look, my husband got his own way once with cement after an arguement that nearly sent us Into the divorce courts. That's why the cemented rear garden is HIS garden.


I bet he likes the easy up keep.:sneaky:
Freebird11
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Freebird11 »

Easy Home Gardening Tips:

1. To remove the salt deposits that form on clay pots, combine equal parts white vinegar, rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. Apply the mixture to the pot and scrub with a plastic brush. Let the pot dry before you plant anything in it.

2. To prevent accumulating dirt under your fingernails while you work in the garden, draw your fingernails across a bar of soap and you'll effectively seal the undersides of your nails so dirt can't collect beneath them. Then, after you've finished in the garden, use a nailbrush to remove the soap and your nails will be sparkling clean.

3. To prevent the line on your string trimmer from jamming or breaking, treat with a spray vegetable oil before installing it in the trimmer.

4. Turn a long-handled tool into a measuring stick! Lay a long-handled garden tool on the ground, and next to it place a tape measure. Using a permanent marker, write inch and foot marks on the handle. When you need to space plants a certain distance apart (from just an inch to several feet) you'll already have a measuring device in your hand.

5. To have garden twine handy when you need it, just stick a ball of twine in a small clay pot, pull the end of the twine through the drainage hole, and set the pot upside down in the garden. Do that, and you'll never go looking for twine again.

6. Little clay pots make great cloches for protecting young plants from sudden, overnight frosts and freezes.

7. To turn a clay pot into a hose guide, just stab a roughly one-foot length of steel reinforcing bar into the ground at the corner of a bed and slip two clay pots over it: one facing down, the other facing up. The guides will prevent damage to your plants as you drag the hose along the bed.

8. To create perfectly natural markers, write the names of plants (using a permanent marker) on the flat faces of stones of various sizes and place them at or near the base of your plants.

9. Got aphids? You can control them with a strong blast of water from the hose or with insecticidal soap. But here's another suggestion, one that's a lot more fun; get some tape! Wrap a wide strip of tape around your hand, sticky side out, and pat the leaves of plants infested with aphids. Concentrate on the undersides of leaves, because that's where the little buggers like to hide.

10. The next time you boil or steam vegetables, don't pour the water down the drain, use it to water potted patio plants, and you'll be amazed at how the plants respond to the "vegetable soup."
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Bryn Mawr
Posts: 15917
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 4:54 pm

Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Bryn Mawr »

Freebird11;1367121 wrote: Easy Home Gardening Tips:

1. To remove the salt deposits that form on clay pots, combine equal parts white vinegar, rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. Apply the mixture to the pot and scrub with a plastic brush. Let the pot dry before you plant anything in it.

2. To prevent accumulating dirt under your fingernails while you work in the garden, draw your fingernails across a bar of soap and you'll effectively seal the undersides of your nails so dirt can't collect beneath them. Then, after you've finished in the garden, use a nailbrush to remove the soap and your nails will be sparkling clean.

3. To prevent the line on your string trimmer from jamming or breaking, treat with a spray vegetable oil before installing it in the trimmer.

4. Turn a long-handled tool into a measuring stick! Lay a long-handled garden tool on the ground, and next to it place a tape measure. Using a permanent marker, write inch and foot marks on the handle. When you need to space plants a certain distance apart (from just an inch to several feet) you'll already have a measuring device in your hand.

5. To have garden twine handy when you need it, just stick a ball of twine in a small clay pot, pull the end of the twine through the drainage hole, and set the pot upside down in the garden. Do that, and you'll never go looking for twine again.

6. Little clay pots make great cloches for protecting young plants from sudden, overnight frosts and freezes.

7. To turn a clay pot into a hose guide, just stab a roughly one-foot length of steel reinforcing bar into the ground at the corner of a bed and slip two clay pots over it: one facing down, the other facing up. The guides will prevent damage to your plants as you drag the hose along the bed.

8. To create perfectly natural markers, write the names of plants (using a permanent marker) on the flat faces of stones of various sizes and place them at or near the base of your plants.

9. Got aphids? You can control them with a strong blast of water from the hose or with insecticidal soap. But here's another suggestion, one that's a lot more fun; get some tape! Wrap a wide strip of tape around your hand, sticky side out, and pat the leaves of plants infested with aphids. Concentrate on the undersides of leaves, because that's where the little buggers like to hide.

10. The next time you boil or steam vegetables, don't pour the water down the drain, use it to water potted patio plants, and you'll be amazed at how the plants respond to the "vegetable soup."


Interesting ideas, thank you and welcome to the Garden.
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Oscar Namechange
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Any Gardner's here?..

Post by Oscar Namechange »

Hi Thank You for the tips and welcome to the forum:

I did buy some plants this week and made a start.

A Honeysuckle to hug the fence, a Jasmine and a Budlia.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon

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