That air crash in Colombia

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That air crash in Colombia

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First picture of 'hero' pilot who 'dumped fuel seconds before Colombian crash' preventing massive explosion and more deaths - Mirror Online

I don't think I've ever quoted anything from the Mirror before.

I've only started the thread in order to link to that article.

That article is the most bogus, uninformed and lying article I've ever seen in a newspaper, starting with the "dump fuel" notion.

I expect the Mirror wanted to sell papers on the back of sensationalist claptrap.
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That air crash in Colombia

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Here we go - the first glimpse of daylight in contrast to the Mirror's baloney.The recordings, obtained by several Colombian media outlets, seemed to confirm the accounts of a surviving flight attendant and a pilot flying nearby who overheard the frantic pleas from the doomed airliner. These, along with the lack of an explosion upon impact, point to a rare case of fuel running out as a cause of the crash of the airliner, which experts say was flying at its maximum range.

Colombia plane crash: leaked audio shows pilot said he ran out of fuel

The next bit will be how far can that type of plane fly on a full load of fuel compared to how far it was flown, and the bit about the pilot being the owner and the plane being the only one the company owned, and whether getting forced into a holding pattern at the end of the flight was something he was meant to have enough fuel left to cope with.

Followed, I hope, by why did all those football bosses hire his company in particular to fly their teams around South America.

After which we can go back and trash the Mirror's "hero pilot" article line by lying line and word by lying word.

To start with, that particular type of plane has no fuel dump option, it can't be done. The Mirror can scarcely have failed to know that elementary piece of information, it's immediately checkable.

If you're forced into a holding pattern when you're flying on fumes, and you'll go bankrupt if you declare a fuel emergency, do you declare an emergency and land or do you grit your teeth and hope for the best?
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That air crash in Colombia

Post by Bryn Mawr »

spot;1503169 wrote:

If you're forced into a holding pattern when you're flying on fumes, and you'll go bankrupt if you declare a fuel emergency, do you declare an emergency and land or do you grit your teeth and hope for the best?


Pretty damn'd quickly if you're going to be dead PDQ if you don't.
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That air crash in Colombia

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Factor in being South American, where men are men and pilots are invariably heroes.
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That air crash in Colombia

Post by Bryn Mawr »

spot;1503171 wrote: Factor in being South American, where men are men and pilots are invariably heroes.


Chapecoense air crash: Leaked tape shows plane 'ran out of fuel' - BBC News

A pilot can be heard repeatedly requesting permission to land due to an electric failure and lack of fuel.
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That air crash in Colombia

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What the BBC may be missing is the order of events.

Requests for permission may be refused if there's a priority emergency in progress. To get down without delay you'd need to declare an emergency too rather than make repeated requests, but then you'd be scrutinized.

Planes suffer electric failure if their engines stop through lack of fuel.

The holding pattern, which the plane finally broke from without declaring an emergency, was around 20,000 feet. The message you quote was sent from 9,000 feet. The crash site is around 7,000 feet.
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That air crash in Colombia

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More news regarding the hero pilot.

'What he did was mass murder': little sympathy for Colombia plane crash pilot

Perhaps if the Mirror simply closed out of a sense of shame and futility? It would improve the condition of England overnight.
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That air crash in Colombia

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There's very little evidence that tabloid newspapers actually employ fully trained journalists. Storytellers, gossip mongers and manipulative fibbers.

Where are the modern day John Pilgers ? Nowhere near the red tops, that's for sure.
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That air crash in Colombia

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The Assistant News Editor at Mirror Online whose byline appears on the article is Anthony Bond - perhaps he'd like to explain how his name is associated with such disrespectful ill-judged claptrap, I'd be interested.

He tweets at https://twitter.com/Bondy81 if anyone would like to ask.
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That air crash in Colombia

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At the press conference, Claros said the crash was an “isolated” incident and did not mean it was unsafe to fly in Bolivia. Still he said the government would accelerate the process of implementing a new aeronautical safety system.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/ ... estigation



Bolivia’s public works minister, Milton Claros, who oversees Bolivia’s aviation authority, should be prosecuted for incompetent administration at the very least.

Blaming the one person on the ground who actually challenged the flight but had no authority to stop it, air traffic controller Celia Castedo, just adds insult to injury.
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Re: That air crash in Colombia

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We're four years on, this scandal has still not been resolved.

This is a translation of a couple of Spanish news articles. The fact that the one person who tried to prevent the flight, Celia Castedo, still has to live in Brazilian exile is an outrage.

1. An investigation into last year’s tragic plane crash in Colombia’s second biggest city Medellin that killed most of the squad of Brazilian club team Chapecoense has yet to produce any result, reported El Tiempo newspaper on Tuesday.

Bolivian authorities have decided to extend the deadline for the investigation by another six months due to the “complexity of the case” that also involves investigative teams from Colombia and Brazil as they seek to establish the facts behind the tragedy that killed 71 people. - https://www.reuters.com/article/us-colo ... SKBN13V2AY

“We have a term of six months more that the judge has extended and according to the information that we are gathering, we will see the relevance or not of expanding the case against the people who are involved,” said District Attorney of Santa Cruz, Freddy Larrea. - https://colombiareports.com/still-no-re ... -colombia/
2. Bolivian Interior Minister Carlos Romero said Celia Castedo had illegally bypassed migration controls on her way out of the country in an attempt to flee justice.

The Minister of Government, Carlos Romero, said on Tuesday that he is awaiting a court order to notify Interpol and activate the international capture of Celia Castedo - https://www.la-razon.com/lr-article/pol ... aso-lamia/

The CNN investigative team led by Barón in logistical coordination with Monne, unsuccessfully tried to meet with Bolivian government authorities. The then Minister of the Presidency, Juan Ramón Quintana, refused to provide the required interview, as did the Minister of Public Works, Milton Claros. The journalists were referred to intermediate instances where the official version on the responsibilities of the tragedy was insisted: Miguel Quiroga Murakami, pilot of the ship, was the only culprit; but he died in the accident and therefore "case closed."

In addition to blaming the pilot post-mortem , the explanation assumed by the Bolivian Government on the causes of the disaster is reduced to 48 hours prior to the fatal trip in which the respective Flight Plan was processed, entrusting lower-ranking officials with the responsibility of having authorized the trip from Santa Cruz to Medellín in violation of basic security protocols; although the real genesis of the tragedy transcends the isolated routine of a Flight Plan, as we will see later.

Two innocent plant airport officials —Celia Castedo and Miguel Teodovich Ponce, technicians from the Airport and Air Navigation Services Administration (Aasana) - were charged with judicial orders for preventive imprisonment, while the government leadership refined its strategy to get rid of the affair - http://www.soldepando.com/ministros-de- ... sabilidad/ June 10 2018

3. Bolivian who warned about LaMia flight has renewed asylum request and continues to live in Corumbá : https://diarionline.com.br/?s=noticia&id=113864

Leonardo Cabral on December 03, 2019

Reproduction / El Deber

Célia arrived in Corumbá in December 2016
Celia Castedo Monasterio, a former employee of the Administration of Airports and Auxiliary Services of Air Navigation in Bolivia, had her request for refuge renewed in Brazil. She has lived in Corumbá since December 2016, when her request was accepted by the Brazilian courts, after justifying that in Bolivia she was persecuted after declarations about the plane crash that killed 71 people.

The then employee of the Administration of Airports and Auxiliary Services of Air Navigation of Bolivia (Aasana), allegedly pointed out problems in the flight plan that carried the delegation of Chapecoense, journalists and crew to the city of Medellín, in Colombia, on November 28, 2016. Of the 76 people on the aircraft, 71 died. The Brazilian team would dispute the South American football final that year.

Three years after the tragedy, Celia Castedo ratifies that the flight should not have left, as she, as an inspector, would have warned, but after a higher order from the General Directorate of Civil Aeronautics, the plane was released to continue on to Colombia.

The plane's flight plan presented by the company LaMia at the airport of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, in Bolivia, from where the aircraft departed, had at least four points questioned by the official responsible for checking the document. Among them, the autonomy of the flight, since there was concern that the amount of fuel in the aircraft was not enough to make the journey to Medellín.

International aviation rules require the airplane to have fuel available for at least half an hour longer than the estimated time on the route, as there may be a need for the aircraft to look for another airport or wait for a runway to land. After reporting her questions, the employee reportedly passed the document on to flight controllers. It is not known why, even with doubts, the trip was authorized.

Aasana sent to the Bolivian Public Prosecutor's Office a crime report against Celia Castedo for "non-compliance with duties" and "attempt against transport security". She was suspended from office on suspicion of negligence on December 1 and then came to Corumbá and asked for refuge.

The refuge is a legal protection that Brazil offers to citizens of other countries that are suffering persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, social group or political opinions, or that are subject, in their country, to serious and widespread violation human rights.


03/01/2017 Bolivian on Chape flight: "I was threatened with death as if I was guilty"

12/08/2016 Celia Castedo issues letter and says she was pressured to change report

12/06/2016 Bolivian minister wants Brazil to expel employee who asked for refuge in Corumbá

12/06/2016 Air Tragedy: Bolivian refugee request formalized in PF
4. MOSCOW (UrduPoint News / Sputnik - 15th January, 2020) Former Bolivian Interior Minister Carlos Romero has been detained amid accusations of corruption, according to ex-president Evo Morales who has condemned the detention as a violation of human rights.

"We denounce before the national and international community the illegal detention of the former Minister of Government, Carlos Romero, in clear violation of constitutional guarantees and human rights. Romero was taken from the clinic where he remained under medical care," Morales wrote on Twitter on Tuesday.

Romero was hospitalized in La Paz earlier this month. He was detained on Tuesday afternoon when he was leaving the hospital and was taken to the Prosecutor's Office.

Morales stepped down in November of last year, after the controversial presidential election. Most of Bolivia's senior officials resigned in his wake. The power in the country was assumed by the opposition vice-speaker of the senate, Jeanine Anez. Morales, who has fled to Mexico, called the recent events in Bolivia a coup - https://www.urdupoint.com/en/world/boli ... 10440.html
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Re: That air crash in Colombia

Post by spot »

That "reporter" is still on the books at the Daily Mirror - https://muckrack.com/anthony-bond
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