Bipolar Disorder

Discuss Mental Health topics & issues.
nev
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:22 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

My wife suffers from an illness known as Bipolar disorder. For the last 5 years I have supported and battled with everyone including her to persuade them of this. Her family refuse to help and are still in denial of it. Finally 2 years ago I was believed and I have worked together with our doctor and a psychiatrist to properly diagnose it and start her on medication. 3 different medications later we hope that the right medication has finally been found but it will still take another possibly 2 years before we know correctly. It has all taken a difficult toll on me. I have struggled to keep my job and life together. Last few months she has gone through her latest manic phase and I have struggled. This weekend has been another very tough one and a friend of mine suggested that I communicate with someone going through similar challenges just to exchange and learn.

If anyone reading this is going through similarly or has any suggestions please let me know.

Cheers.

nev
:)
lady cop
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Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2004 1:00 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by lady cop »

i just read your previous posts...you clearly have faith. i hope that people here will be able to help you...my only experience with a person diagnosed as bipolar was cutting them down from hanging themselves. it's serious, as you know. i hope you find the strength. but don't lose yourself. do you have children? my real concern is the number of females killing their kids and claiming "insanity".
libertine
Posts: 190
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:42 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by libertine »

Our teen aged granddaughter was recently diagnosed bi-polar. Like you it was a battle, as everyone said "it's just being a teenager" but finally she got really bizarre and someone else beleived. We are lucky that she got help so quickly, as she hadn't really fallen into that up and down cycle yet. THey put her on Lithium and Zoloft.

I really didn't want to see that, but she is so much happier, AND not 'zonked'. She still has attitude but is more content. She at least thinks now before she acts. It doesn't keep her from teen aged craziness, but at least she thinks about it before she does it and realizes there are consequences. Before she was oblivious to the whole idea of what comes after.

I hope in the future your wife's meication will level her out and you can return to a normal life.
devist8me
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Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 9:38 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by devist8me »

My ex-husband was bipolar and I would be glad to talk with you about that time of my life in private if you like. PM me.
I probably posted that in an ambien trance-soryy
jasmund
Posts: 407
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2005 10:28 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by jasmund »

My ex-husband and neighbor are bi-polar if you need to chat just click on my avatar.



-always have an open ear for someones problems

-hang in there
alobar51
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 10:49 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by alobar51 »

nev wrote: My wife suffers from an illness known as Bipolar disorder. For the last 5 years I have supported and battled with everyone including her to persuade them of this. Her family refuse to help and are still in denial of it. Finally 2 years ago I was believed and I have worked together with our doctor and a psychiatrist to properly diagnose it and start her on medication. 3 different medications later we hope that the right medication has finally been found but it will still take another possibly 2 years before we know correctly. It has all taken a difficult toll on me. I have struggled to keep my job and life together. Last few months she has gone through her latest manic phase and I have struggled. This weekend has been another very tough one and a friend of mine suggested that I communicate with someone going through similar challenges just to exchange and learn.

If anyone reading this is going through similarly or has any suggestions please let me know.

Cheers.



nev


My cousin was bi-polar.

There are adjunct things you can do to maximizr the effectivenees of her meds.

Get in touch, if you wish.
nev
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:22 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

Thank you to all of you for your advice and assistance, and especially those who replied to my private messages.

It is all very much appreciated.

Cheers.

nev
:)
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Bella_Boo
Posts: 523
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 4:47 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by Bella_Boo »

nev wrote: Thank you to all of you for your advice and assistance, and especially those who replied to my private messages.



It is all very much appreciated.



Cheers.



nev


Hello there... Ive had first hand experience with Bipolar Disorders... my father suffers... Our struggle with him has taken its toll and ripped out family apart many times. When I was about 10 I couldnt understand his illness, he wasnt diagnosed and I just lost the plot and threw a chair out the window... We went as a family into counselling... to compound the illness dad also suffers from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) from the sudden death of his parents at a young age as well as being a Vietnam Veteran... It was a slow process... years of therapy, medication changes (his heart stopped on lithium) and many many hours of reading, listening, understanding... Mum had to cancel the checking account as when he was on highs he used to write checks without checking the accounts... and when on lows... he just wouldnt want to get out of bed... we were lucky we owned our own business and could survive with this fluctuation but it took its toll on mum... she is a nurse and i think she went to work just to get a few hours break...



But there is light at the end of the tunnel... With bad there comes good... where there are lows there are highs... where there is understanding there is compassion...



After many years of tears... arguing... therapy and missed events (dad missed my brothers school graduation from being on a low, he missed out on seeing my first holy communion, just to name a few....) I can say things have become easier... He is on 3 prozacs a day and also take carbomazapane (excuse spelling...) as a mood balancer - they give these to people that suffer from epilepsy... it balances the brains chemicals...



Dad smiles more... he still has his bad days... and always will... he still goes to therapy once a week and is on close drug control. Once a year he goes into hospital and gets taken off the drugs till its out of his system and then restarts (so his body doesnt get used to them and a result keep dosing more and more).... he usually is in hospital then for a month... we dont visit him during this time as it is anguish for him but we sent him letters and call him daily...



Its been tough living with someone with this disorder... and i do understand to an extent what you are going through... I am very close to my dad and he talks about it alot with me - we both suffer from sleeplessness...



I wish you all the best in you challenges with what this disorder has to offer... You can always PM me anytime regarding this matter... I live with this everyday... I am always here to listen and to help where i can *hugs*
:lips: i have no signature:lips:
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Galbally
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Galbally »

I know 2 people personally who suffer from bipolar, and both are quite different in how they present this disease. I will be glad to tell you my experience of these things if you want to PM me.
"We are never so happy, never so unhappy, as we imagine"



Le Rochefoucauld.



"A smack in the face settles all arguments, then you can move on kid."



My dad 1986.
RedGlitter
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Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:51 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by RedGlitter »

Nev,

I am bipolar with a tendency toward big depression. I made my family's life hell for years before I got the proper diagnosis and medication. You're to be commended for sticking it out. My fiance couldn't handle me and he bailed. It's important that you keep in mind that your wife doesn't mean to act the way she does. She doesn't mean to make you miserable; it's the illness that's doing it. Nobody wants to be that way. And if her current medications aren't working then press on and keep trying till you find one that works. Best wishes.
nev
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:22 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

Thank you Redglitter for your honest sharing. I wish you well.

Kind regards.

nev
:)
tedhutchinson
Posts: 254
Joined: Tue Nov 15, 2005 11:02 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by tedhutchinson »

Anyone with Bipolar or living with someone should consider if the mood swings are influenced seasonally. If there is a seasonal pattern in hospital admissions or manic episodes then it is worth trying to even out the levels of Vitamin D.

We all know that vitamin D is obtained for free from direct exposure of the skin to sunshine.



Some of though may cover ourselves with sunblock to avoid skin cancer and this will of course block the rays which generate Vitamin d. Others unfortunately live above latitude 40N and so for much of the year are unable to get vitamin d from sunlight in Late Autumn Winter and Early Spring. Those who are interested may want to play with the calculator http://zardoz.nilu.no/%7Eolaeng/fastrt/VitD-ez.html here to work out when they should put on their swimsuit and go outside. If only 10% of you skin is exposed then you will only make 10% of your daily amount. You need full body exposure for about 10 minutes Maybe 20 if it's a bit cloudy to get 12000iu. Dark skinned people will need 6 to 10 times longer.

The alternative to natural sunlight is suntanning sunbeds, not to get a tan but to use them only long enough to start the vitamin D synthesis as above. As you use about 4000iu daily you may also consider

See http://www.cholecalciferol-council.com/ The Vitamin D council for full details.

The story of how Vitamin D affects our brains is a bit complicated and I'm a bit busy at the moment so perhaps you will forgive this garbled version.

The major structural component of the brain is DHA which is an omega 3 fatty acid which we get mainly from oily fish. Why then should the levels of omega vary seasonally I hear you ask? Well in order to absorb DHA into the astrocytes (these are the brain cells that communicate between the brain neurones) there has to be an ion exchange to allow the DHA to pass through the cell wall. This ion exchange only takes place in the presence of vitamin D. and as we know those who live North of Boston USA will not get sufficient Vitamin D from the sun in winter so not only are they vitamin d deficient but this causes a knockon effect on their Omega 3 status.

The message for Bipolar's and those that care for them is to ensure they take 3g of OMEGA3 daily. You need to check your Fish Oil supplements as some high strength capsules only contain 180EPA + 120 DHA=.3 g so you would need 10 of these. Fortunately some suppliers do a liquid form of OMEGA JUICE which supplie 3g in 10 ml (2 tsps) and this is easier to take.

So supplementing with both vitamin D (or using a sunbed) while taking OMEGA 3 may stabilise the mood swings as well as enhancing the effect of current medication enabling, under medical supervision, a lower dose to still be effective.
GuidingStar
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 12:43 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by GuidingStar »

I was diagnosed as Bipolar II back in October. My disorder took a big toll on my family. When I was hyperactive and angry, I was depressed and wanted nothing to do with them. As you know, being with someone who is Bipolar is tough, but you're obviously a very strong person. I wish you both the best.
MzInterpret
Posts: 71
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 4:01 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by MzInterpret »

Nev, I have a friend whose hubby is bipolar and I have a glimpse of the hell she goes through when I see them together.

She has joined the Bipolar awareness site and is so supported on the forums there, that she is coming to terms with his condition. Have a look at it. It is very professional and the support is phenomenal.
nev
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:22 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

Thanks again to everyone who has contributed and also sent me private messages. It has been very helpful.

Cheers.
:)
Jives
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Jives »

I've had two "manic-depressive" people in my life (as the disease was then known.) Both committed suicide.

Good luck to you, sir. I cannot give you advice, because obviously I am not able to deal with it successfully, despite my best attempts.:(
All the world's a stage and the men and women merely players...Shakespeare
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CARLA
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Post by CARLA »

Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Bipolar Disorder what use to be called Manic Depressive disorder :confused: Just a new name in a new age.

My X-Husband was Manic Depressive he is now deceased. I understand your concerns and hope with the new medication on the market a balance can be reached. Back in the 60's when I was married and living with my X I remember being unsure of him each and everyday. It is very difficult when you don't suffer from this, to understand it. I never felt safe, or secure in his presence which lead to our divorce. They didn't understand it back then like they do now.

Bless you all I hope you can find peace with this somehow..
ALOHA!!

MOTTO TO LIVE BY:

"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming.

WOO HOO!!, what a ride!!!"

nev
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

Carla,

Yes you are correct Bipolar Disorder is still also known as Manic Depression. Sufferers prefer using Bipolar Disorder as it also sounds better.

Your description of what you went through is what many carers of Manic Depressives do go through. I am now a member of a carer group and it seems common the overwhelming pain, helplessness, hopelessness, confusion and despair that one goes through. All we must do however is try to keep ourselves whole, and then honestly encourage the sufferer to seek and sustain treatment. We do not have many friends because the moment people sense the difficulty they keep away (I cannot blame them!).

In my case too my wife's family offer no support. Thay pay lip service but it is obvious that they are unhappy with it (and with me!), in denial as to what really is involved and therefore the kind of ignorant/selfish support they give does more harm. And that therefore becomes an added battle.

Thanks for your post and keep well.

Cheers.

nev
:)
Jives
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Jives »

nev wrote: Jives your message could not have reached me at a more critical time. In the last two days especially I know I too cannot deal with it successfully. I will just have to continue to do my best as I believe is right and leave the rest to the guy above. The pain, helplessness and despair of it all I must admit can be most overwhelming.

Thanks you for your post.

Cheers and God bless!


Dear Nev:

Usually I can be of a great deal of help to others, (it's my gift and profession, after all!) But sadly, I had to tell the truth to you the other day. I, educated as I am, resourceful as I am, and perservering as both you and I are, was completely unable to stop the terrible consequences I related to you.

Please believe me when I say that I tried everything humanly possible to avoid these disastrous occurances. But I failed.

If I take you to say that you have given up the fight, please do not do so on my account. For I never gave up myself, I merely failed to succeed. The life of your loved one is worthy of the fight.

There's a story of a famous man who had something similar to our mutual problems. His wife was struck down by a mental malady similar to this one. Hers was so bad that she had to be chained in the basement, when he wasn't attending to her (this was in a time of little or no medical service.)

During the day, this great man fought bravely to not only survive the terrible burden which which he was saddled, but to create a new country and fight a war of independence against a merciless and powerful foe.

At night, alone, he tended to his wife. Washed her, fed her, and tried his best to calm her troubled spirit. He could not recall the duration of her madness, nor could he recount the endless progression of days and months he had descended the cellar stairs. All the hours of his life had blended into one solitary hour of despair.

Despite this, he never gave up his fight. Not his fight for his wife, and not his fight for his country.

You can see his troubled mind in these words:

Shall we try argument? Shall we resort to entreaty?What terms shall we find that have not already been exhausted? We have petitioned, we have remonstrated, we have supplicated...we have been spurned by contempt. There is no longer any room for hope. is life so dear to be purchased at the price of chains?

Forbid it, Almight God!

I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!!

when I feel tired and despondent over my poor girl's health problems, which have drug on for decades, i remember the valiant fight which Patrick Henry fought. And the incredible heights he rose to, despite all his problems...

and I feel better.

Perhaps you can gain inspiration from him too.

Here is a post chronicling my own struggle. (See next post)
All the world's a stage and the men and women merely players...Shakespeare
Jives
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Jives »

Here's the post of my own personal struggle:



This post really strikes a chord with me. You see....my wife really did know she had terrible health problems when she married me. She had already had two bowel resections and a complete hysterectomy as well as a long history of other ailments.

I met her during a period of relative health for her and never suspected she had problems at all....and she didn't tell me for fear she would lose me.

We dated for a year, and then married. That's when the health problems resurfaced and they've been an uphill battle ever since. She's had TIAs, strokes, four more surgeries, each worse than the last. She's troubled by horrible post-traumatic syndrome thanks to an abusive marriage in her youth, and of course like anyone in her position, she has terrible insecurity and is constantly worried she will lose me. She suffers horrible nightmares, her circulation is so bad that parts of her body die off occasionally and have to be nursed back to health painstakingly.

We've been to 14 doctors, six hospitals, and innumerable specialists. She has been hospitalized, for periods greater than a month, over 110 times in the last 11 years that we have been married by my counting.

It's 11 years later now, I've been bankrupted twice, I work 4 jobs to make ends meet, and yet even with my stable and dependable job, over $5,000,000 worth of health bills loom in the future.

The future is unbelievably bleak. Her health continues to deteriorate, she will die, not too soon, but not too much later either. I give her slightly over 15 years, perhaps less with her heavy smoking, about the time I will retire. At that time, all that I have built in my life, my savings, my car, my very home will be forfeit for the bills.

I will end my life dead broke after a lifetime of work. (I've only been unemployed for a total of 7 days since I was 15). After lifetime of striving and grappling, I will most likely end my life a ward of the state, destitute and alone.

You'd most likely think this prospect would depress me. You might also be wondering why I stayed with her for so long at the sacrifice of my own entire life and future, despite her deception, and never bailed to save myself.

That would be love.

NVal, you say that your husband's character was to blame for his desertion. But I think it was something else. I don't think he truly understood what love is, and I am positive he wasn't ever in love with you at all, even if he thought he was. when I said, "in sickness and in health" like everyone else, i assumed that I would get way more health than sickness, but that hasn't turned out to be the case. A vow is a vow, however. And I don't intend to break it.

The good Lord knows I thought of it often, but each time I was reminded just how much she means to me, and that without her, life itself might be more comfortable, but would be infinitely pointless.

I have no regrets, I've lived a life of adventure that most men can only dream of, from the high stratophere of near space to the gutter, from the pinacle of the corporate world, to the depths of jail, from....well, you get the picture.

So I have held on to her, cherishing every single second that I get with her. A thousand times at her bedside, as I looked at her gray skin and closed eyes, listened to her shallow breathing and watched her sunken features, I have asked the Lord to grant me just one more hour, just another day, a month a year....

And each time he has relented and let me have her for just a little more time. (I'm kind of selfish that way.)

So when I die, others may see my final years as tragic, not me.

It was all worth it.
All the world's a stage and the men and women merely players...Shakespeare
nev
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:22 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

Hi Jives,

Very inspiring - both your posts.

I have certainly not given up - in fact I am now fighting even harder. But I do accept that I will never find the "success" that I have previously envisaged or hoped for.

I am a Christian; and I take the teachings of Jesus Christ seriously. I believe I must do what's right first of all for myself then for those who depend on me, family, friends, acquaintances and then the rest of the world.

My wife's illness, which I also had not been made aware of prior to our marriage, I believe is my/our greatest test! The pain, helplessness and despair of it all sometimes is most overwhelming. How matters will end I have no idea - but I will continue to try to search for what I believe is right, try my best and then leave it to the guy above.

Again many thanks for your mail - your difficulties are infinitely more heavier then mine and I pray that you be given the strength, protection and guidance to go forth as you believe is right.

Cheers.

nev
:)
Jives
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Jives »

Well said, Nev. And to think that right now, another poster is questioning the value of forums in another thread.

Your strength allows me to bestow upon you the greatest title I have in my stock:

True Blue Guy.

You deserve it. Good luck.
All the world's a stage and the men and women merely players...Shakespeare
Saffron
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Saffron »

I'm not pipolar, and I've never lived with anyone who is. But the apartment manager where I used to live was bipolar. She had a way of driving everyone who lived in the complex crazy. She was an awful person. I'm not going into detail, but she lived next door to me, and she'd gossip about everybody in the complex. She caused people so many problems. She was totally rude too. I moved out. I could not stand to be even next door to her. :-5 :(
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weeder
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by weeder »

Jives wrote: Well said, Nev. And to think that right now, another poster is questioning the value of forums in another thread.

Your strength allows me to bestow upon you the greatest title I have in my stock:

True Blue Guy.

You deserve it. Good luck.
Your life story, is very similar to mine. At the end of my life I will more than likely be in the same position as you describe. And yet I am not ashamed, because I have always understood the concept of selflissness. The object of my affections is not a mate it is my sons. One more troubled than the other. I have actually considered the possibility just recently that he may very well be manic depressive, or bi polar also. I have friends in my life with bi polar husbands and children. I have always thought the the condition was too often diagnosed, and felt that medication is given out too frequently. After watching my gifted, and warm hearted son decline to the point where he can sleep three days at a time(hes 21) and be so emmotionally distraught that he cannott keep a job,I long to have him evaluated, and medicated if his life could turn around. He will not comply. Relatives and friends have all washed their hands of him. When I was away working in Georgia, he wound up homeless hungry, cold, and living in a van. I thought he could make it on his own. He couldnt. I came back to Virginia and am content for the time being to have him fed, safe, and warm. My salary here is one third of what I earned before so it looks like bankrupsy may be right around the corner for me. It doesnt matter. There is no greater purpose in life than putting another humans needs before your own. And, as you always so generously show us, sharing heartfelt pieces of your life with others here, to guide, comfort,or enlighten them. Forums useless? This place is affirmation to the goodness of mankind, and a rich example of people holding each other up in good times and bad. Best wishes and blessings to all of you suffering with difficult circumstances. May God give you the continued strength to keep going.
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simonsiegel
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:54 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by simonsiegel »

nev wrote: My wife suffers from an illness known as Bipolar disorder. For the last 5 years I have supported and battled with everyone including her to persuade them of this. Her family refuse to help and are still in denial of it. Finally 2 years ago I was believed and I have worked together with our doctor and a psychiatrist to properly diagnose it and start her on medication. 3 different medications later we hope that the right medication has finally been found but it will still take another possibly 2 years before we know correctly. It has all taken a difficult toll on me. I have struggled to keep my job and life together. Last few months she has gone through her latest manic phase and I have struggled. This weekend has been another very tough one and a friend of mine suggested that I communicate with someone going through similar challenges just to exchange and learn.

If anyone reading this is going through similarly or has any suggestions please let me know.

Cheers.

nev


I was looking into what bipolar disorder and I didn't find any real scientific reasoning behind this disease. Like, how do people actually diagnose this disease? Is there like a CAT Scan or blood drawn.
nev
Posts: 38
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by nev »

simonsiegel wrote: I was looking into what bipolar disorder and I didn't find any real scientific reasoning behind this disease. Like, how do people actually diagnose this disease? Is there like a CAT Scan or blood drawn.


As you probably are aware Bipolar Disorder is an illness that affects a sufferer's moods in a way that they uncontrollably vary from high to low. From euphoria to depression. From recklessness to listlessness. The condition is also known as manic-depression or manic-depressive illness — from manias on the one extreme to depression on the other.

Its causes are elusive, and there's no cure. The flares of bipolar disorder may last for weeks or months, causing great disturbances in the lives of those affected, their friends and their families. Left untreated, the condition usually worsens. But it can be managed with medications and other therapies.

People with bipolar disorder often don't recognize how impaired they are when experiencing a mood episode and how greatly the disorder is affecting their lives and the lives of others. Friends, family and primary care physicians are important in recognizing possible signs of bipolar disorder and urging the person to seek professional help.

If a person shows signs of bipolar disorder, then their "carer" begins to note carefully every detail of the patterns that are occuring and start encouraging, usually unsuccessfully at first, that person to seek the care of a psychiatrist.

The doctor/specialist will ask the carer about the signs and symptoms and to describe apparent episodes of mania and depression. Diagnosis also involves ruling out other mental health conditions that may produce some symptoms similar to bipolar disorder. These may include other mood disorders, sometimes schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or borderline personality disorder.

Diagnosis is a long, painful process. In my case it took me many years to persuade anyone/everyone the difficulties occuring and working with the specialist to diagnose. My wife's family attitude still today range from denial to "I do not want to know...". It will now take a further long period to identify the right medication etc. More importantly I have to accept that this will be a life-long challenge and do the necessary to keep myself whole through all the various experiences.

Hope I have answered your question.

Cheers.

nev
:)
RubyRed
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Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 2:15 pm

Bipolar Disorder

Post by RubyRed »

It took me a very long time to become medication-compliant...even now I slip-and-slide. I pretend to those around me I don't but, they know, they've been there...I'm lucky they are there and continue to be. Even then the medication isn't always the safety-net it ought to appear to be...situations change, neurotransmitters change...situational flux hits hard.

Supposedly you take the pills to BE NORMAL...nothing feels normal about it...you lapse into a world that isn't your own...it's about security and NORMALITY for those around you...much, SO MUCH, of YOU, is lost...somewhere else...determined by everyone and everything else - you always know the determinations they are making are for you and 'your own good'...but it hurts to know that you are sometimes beyond the active in that determination - simply an individual to be make 'OK' by it all...through the greatest efforts by family and friends (those who love you dearly, whom you love dearly) and through the efforts of the medicos...who strive to see you as you could be, with their help. They have a 'you' they are convinced is there...yet it's the disconnected you they fell in love with - parents from birth, friends from school, lovers from teens, partners from formative...

Diagnosis makes sense...covers the bases...explains it...all the erratic behaviour, all the times under the duvet...all the excuses made...all the hurt and pain caused to others...

How do you reconcile the loss of 'YOU' in the potentially hurtful ways for others if to do so becomes the real loss of oneself...

Part of you will always feel that in loving others and accepting love from others you are making a compromise to be less/different from whom you really are. To 'get well for others' will always be a sacrifice of sorts and there will always be resentment...

It's a balancing act of 'hurt'...most bi-polar, myself included, will choose to hurt themselves rather than 'actively' hurt those around them...taking the meds helps but never heals...small indiscretions ought to be allowed...times of control should be accorded...

We fear being out of control but fear control by others...

The boundaries to being ourselves and being that which others expect of us hurts...physically and emotionally...

There remain times when I can't be touch, not even by my daughter, but I continue to relish the times she and I hold each other tight.
Saffron
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by Saffron »

I am starting to go thru menopause, and this must be what it is like to be bipolar.:mad:
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JANELLE
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Bipolar Disorder

Post by JANELLE »

GuidingStar;210158 wrote: I was diagnosed as Bipolar II back in October. My disorder took a big toll on my family. When I was hyperactive and angry, I was depressed and wanted nothing to do with them. As you know, being with someone who is Bipolar is tough, but you're obviously a very strong person. I wish you both the best.




I was diagnosed with bipolar II several years and medications ago. I refused to believe it true. Can you describe your symptoms?

I have since lost my home and job to Hurricane Katrina and I'm having a really hard time getting myself back. I'm hiding my true feelings from my family and friends.
JANELLE
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Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:38 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by JANELLE »

I am desperate for support since Hurricane Katrina. I lost my home and job and have left my beloved New Orleans. I have suffered from chemical depression for years but this is something meds may not be able to help. I am hiding my feelings from my family and friends because they too have lost and have their owns issues. I was diagnosed with bipolar II disorder several years ago but refused to believe it. I am an artist and I'm having a tough time getting back to myself. I would appreciate any direction and comfort. Many thanks and keep your flood insurance current...
Richard Bell
Posts: 1228
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 8:56 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by Richard Bell »

I heard an amazing interview on CBC Radio this morning with a man who has a bi-polar condition.

He was off his medication in June 2003, when he burst into a convenience store with two butcher knives and chased the employee out .

When the SWAT team arrived, he said he was going to get a cop, so they'd better shoot him.

Seven hours of negotiation, and he surrendered peacefully. One of the SWAT officers (Rob Clarke) befriended the man (Blair Milligan), and they both appeared on the radio today.

Milligan got control of his condition, furthered his education, and he now works with Vancouver's homeless people. Clarke is his partner and friend on the police force. Together, these guys are making a difference.

It was quite an inspiring story, with a happy ending. You may even try contacting Blair for advice and support.

You may listen to the interview here :

http://www.cbc.ca/soundslikecanada/interviews.html
Carl44
Posts: 10719
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:23 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by Carl44 »

thank you very much richard i have listened to that it both deeply saddened me but gave me some hope also ....jimbo :thinking: :)
Carl44
Posts: 10719
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:23 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by Carl44 »

after buying books ,down loading stuff picking the wise people on my forums brains i get an email saying its not bi polar now she has a personality disorder whats thats sposed to mean i thought they were the same thing :-5 :-5 :mad:
RedGlitter
Posts: 15777
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:51 am

Bipolar Disorder

Post by RedGlitter »

The lexicon of mental health is boggling at times.

I'm not sure what that would mean; it's so vague. There are all kinds of personality disorders. I'd try to get a copy of the diagnosis to see what exactly they've put down. :confused:

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