monitor advice

gmc
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Post by gmc »

I use a computer a lot. Thinking about upgrading my monitor which I look at throuigh varifocals and I do find my eyes getting strained.

Question would getting say a gaming monitor with a higher refresh rate be worth the extra cost dou you think?
Ahso!
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Post by Ahso! »

Perhaps a larger monitor and play with the brightness settings and font sizes to find what is most comfortable for you.
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gmc
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Post by gmc »

It's a 24inch monitor with font sizes, font, brightness, contrast all set to what I find most comfortable I also use a table lamp so I'm not peering at it in a darkened room or anything like that. It's an expensive experiment if I get it wrong. It's a raedon graphics board so I can fiddle about with the setting on that but I'm just wondering if a higher spec monitor is worth considering - as opposed to what pc world had in their sale.
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LarsMac
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Post by LarsMac »

gmc;1508159 wrote: It's a 24inch monitor with font sizes, font, brightness, contrast all set to what I find most comfortable I also use a table lamp so I'm not peering at it in a darkened room or anything like that. It's an expensive experiment if I get it wrong. It's a raedon graphics board so I can fiddle about with the setting on that but I'm just wondering if a higher spec monitor is worth considering - as opposed to what pc world had in their sale.


Yes, a good gaming monitor would probably be much better for your needs. Something in the 27-32 inch that supports at least a 1080p

ASUS makes some very highly regarded monitors in the Gaming world, these days.
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Bryn Mawr
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

LarsMac;1508161 wrote: Yes, a good gaming monitor would probably be much better for your needs. Something in the 27-32 inch that supports at least a 1080p

ASUS makes some very highly regarded monitors in the Gaming world, these days.


In that case would buying a TV be a reasonable alternative?

Almost all TVs nowadays have a computer input mode and support 1080p and they're usually cheaper than a monitor at that size.
gmc
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Post by gmc »

LarsMac;1508161 wrote: Yes, a good gaming monitor would probably be much better for your needs. Something in the 27-32 inch that supports at least a 1080p

ASUS makes some very highly regarded monitors in the Gaming world, these days.


The monitor I have is 1920 x 1080 in part that's why I'm wondering if the refresh rate makes a big difference since that is the only difference I can see between £100 odd quid and £00-£400.
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Post by Bruv »

gmc;1508156 wrote: I use a computer a lot. Thinking about upgrading my monitor which I look at throuigh varifocals and I do find my eyes getting strained.

Question would getting say a gaming monitor with a higher refresh rate be worth the extra cost dou you think?


Explains a lot about your typing.
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spot
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Post by spot »

I can definitely tell when I have a monitor running a refresh rate of 30Hz or 50Hz compared to 60Hz.

I would believe it if someone showed me convincingly that 72Hz is less of a strain than 60Hz but I've never felt a difference since banning CRT screens from my desk, and I've used both refresh rates a lot.

Anything above 72Hz is pretty pointless, in my experience. Fluorescent lighting is more of a strain than any modern monitor, I've banned that too.

The refresh rate was significant before LED screens but I don't think it's meaningful for an LED screen, the brightness of a pixel doesn't fluctuate on an LED screen. All it tells you is how often the screen content can change. Flicker came, on older technologies, from the brightness varying.

The benefit of high refresh rates on an LED monitor is reducing motion blur when watching video. https://www.cnet.com/news/ultra-hd-4k-tv-refresh-rates/ discusses this.

I prefer 1920x1200 to 1920x1080, given the choice. My current monitor is 27" and I'd feel neck-ache using anything larger. I'm quite happy with 22", but that's just me.

I have absolutely no idea what resolution I'm actually running on this machine at the moment but I know how to find out... one moment... 2560x1440@60Hz. I've been on this screen for nearly 3 years and it will probably see me out. I say the same thing when people offer to buy me new socks.

When I run in iMac mode it's 5120x2880x60Hz but I don't often switch to native mode except for video editing or possibly graphics work.



This would suit me if I were buying today, at £224.98 inc. vat and delivery from ebuyer.

Acer RT280K 28" 4K Ultra HD LED Monitor

3840 x 2160 UHD

1ms Response Time

DVI, HDMI & DisplayPort

60Hz Refresh Rate

300cd/m2 Brightness

It's suited to a DisplayPort cable and headphones, I'd not rely on the internal speakers - the last monitor I bought, I added a soundbar to it.
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Wandrin
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Post by Wandrin »

I have also found that there is less eye strain when using fixed focus glasses that were chosen for the specific distance from the monitor, which is different from my normal reading distance. My "computer glasses" reside on my desk in front of the monitor when I am doing other things with my normal glasses.
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Post by Ahso! »

I use a 42" HD tv monitor and sit about 5' away from it. I don't experience much if anything at all in the way of strain or discomfort. Plus it's easy enough to simply change the HDMI input remotely in order to watch something from the Roku.
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gmc
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Post by gmc »

spot;1508166 wrote: I can definitely tell when I have a monitor running a refresh rate of 30Hz or 50Hz compared to 60Hz.

I would believe it if someone showed me convincingly that 72Hz is less of a strain than 60Hz but I've never felt a difference since banning CRT screens from my desk, and I've used both refresh rates both a lot.

Anything above 72Hz is pretty pointless, in my experience. Fluorescent lighting is more of a strain than any modern monitor, I've banned that too.

The refresh rate was significant before LED screens but I don't think it's meaningful for an LED screen, the brightness of a pixel doesn't fluctuate on an LED screen. All it tells you is how often the screen content can change. Flicker came, on older technologies, from the brightness varying.

The benefit of high refresh rates on an LED monitor is reducing motion blur when watching video. https://www.cnet.com/news/ultra-hd-4k-tv-refresh-rates/ discusses this.

I prefer 1920x1200 to 1920x1080, given the choice. My current monitor is 27" and I'd feel neck-ache using anything larger. I'm quite happy with 22", but that's just me.

I have absolutely no idea what resolution I'm actually running on this machine at the moment but I know how to find out... one moment... 2560x1440@60Hz. I've been on this screen for nearly 3 years and it will probably see me out. I say the same thing when people offer to buy me new socks.

When I run in iMac mode it's 5120x2880x60Hz but I don't often switch to native mode except for video editing or possibly graphics work.



This would suit me if I were buying today, at £224.98 inc. vat and delivery from ebuyer.

Acer RT280K 28" 4K Ultra HD LED Monitor

3840 x 2160 UHD

1ms Response Time

DVI, HDMI & DisplayPort

60Hz Refresh Rate

300cd/m2 Brightness

It's suited to a DisplayPort cable and headphones, I'd not rely on the internal speakers - the last monitor I bought, I added a soundbar to it.


Thanks I'll look in to it a bit more.

posted by wandrin

I have also found that there is less eye strain when using fixed focus glasses that were chosen for the specific distance from the monitor, which is different from my normal reading distance. My "computer glasses" reside on my desk in front of the monitor when I am doing other things with my normal glasses.






Sadly my eysight had got to the point I need glasses to read now as well.

posted by ahso

I use a 42" HD tv monitor and sit about 5' away from it. I don't experience much if anything at all in the way of strain or discomfort. Plus it's easy enough to simply change the HDMI input remotely in order to watch something from the Roku.


Crikey that's enormous. I sit about 2' away from mine.
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Post by Clodhopper »

I've been told that the human eye can't actually tell the difference once you are over a refresh rate of 60Hz, if that's any help.
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Wandrin
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Post by Wandrin »

gmc;1508170 wrote:

Sadly my eysight had got to the point I need glasses to read now as well.


What I was trying to say is that my "computer glasses" are a different magnification than my normal progressive glasses or my reading glasses. The magnification is directly related to the distance from my eyes to the monitor. I found that I was getting eye strain with either my reading glasses or my normal glasses, so I got a pair for the computer.

If you can uses off-the-shelf reading glasses, just measure the distance between eyes and monitor and then test the different magnifications reading text at that distance.
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LarsMac
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Post by LarsMac »

I have found the need for a separate lens to work on my computer.

I have one set of Trifocals, that provides driving/distance view, and close-up reading, and a medium range for computer viewing.

I also had a set of bi-focals made in which the primary lens is the computer reading middle focus, and the secondary is close-up reading. That pair includes the Anti-reflective coating.

It is great.

I have an overhead ceiling light with LED bulbs. I keep the monitor set where I can not reach the screen with an outstretched arm, when sitting normally at my desk. I have also found that it is much better if my eye level is above the vertical middle of the monitor, so I am looking slightly downward to the middle of the screen.

All of that helps reduce the eye and neck strain I was experiencing from working all day on the computer.

As for refresh rate, I do a lot of gaming, so it does make a difference. If you're just reading news and forums and such, it may not seem to matter.

the higher quality monitors give a much cleaner image.
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gmc
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Post by gmc »

seems a bit old school. I have varifocals same idea but without distinct areas.

Varifocal & Progressive Lenses Explained

I just need to move my head slightly to bring most things into focus. When driving i read the roadsigns, read the dials and see my gps and it's street names clearly - I think americans call them progressive lenses.

Came across this article.

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/ ... et-used-to

My optician has recommended varifocals at £500 and single-vision glasses for desk work at £250. My neighbour handed back her varifocals because she couldn’t get on with them. Do I need both pairs or is my optician spinning me a line? How easy is it to adapt to varifocals?


Crikey couldn't believe the prices where on earth can you get tham at such a ridiculously high price and do people not shop round any more?
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LarsMac
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Post by LarsMac »

I tried the progressives, once. Didn't really like them. I'm kinda old-fashioned, I reckon.

My computer glasses have a good range of vision, and I can where them around the office, without issue.

The only thing I can't do with them is drive a car. The world is just a bit too fuzzy out there past my windshield.

Same with my driving lenses. I can do most activities with them, except for extended use of the computer.
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