Testimonials

Discussion group for those recovering from substance abuse. This is the place to talk about your struggles and success in regards to addiction.
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Mystery
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Testimonials

Post by Mystery »

I'm not sure if there are any other recovering people here, but I'd been asked a while back if I'd post my own story, so I will, in the next post. It's an abbreviated version, because I'm choosing to leave out some things, but the highlights are there. Still long though, so I apologize for that. I do encourage others to post their own brushes with substance abuse, if they so choose. First and foremost, this is not about judgment. It's about sharing experiences, strengths, and hopes, in an effort to help those that still suffer. No offense is meant, as these words are mine.
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Mystery
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Post by Mystery »

My name is Robin, and I’m an addict. By the grace of God, I haven’t felt it necessary to take a drink or use a drug since January 19, 2002. This is my story.

I had my first experience with mood altering substances early on. When I was a kid, my mother’s family rented a balcony at a local restaurant to watch the yearly Mardi Gras parade. This particular year, I think I was 8 or 9. My mom had ordered a drink, sprite with rum and a twist of lime. I decided it would be fun to trick her, so I drank it, and tipped the cup over the edge of the balcony to make it look like an accident. Only, the fun of that turned into the fun of the feeling I got. By the end of the afternoon, I’d “accidentally” consumed 3 or 4 of them, till my mom finally caught on. I tell you about this first experience, because I want to get across that my problems didn’t start with alcohol or drugs, my problems started inside. I never felt normal, I never felt all the way content, and I never knew why. That day, on that balcony, I found something that gave me a feeling I’d longed for, in my young mind – something I didn’t even understand. My regular relationship with drugs and/or alcohol started a couple of years down the road. I didn’t ease into anything. I found myself in a position of easy access to liquor and I ran with it. In the beginning, it started slowly, but in a matter of months, I was looking to swipe what I could, with the help of a stepbrother who’d already developed a taste for a life of addiction. Getting drunk became a regular occurrence for me. I’d drink my stepdad’s whiskey and fill the bottle with water (he was a chronic alcoholic, so he never noticed). When out with my sister or my friends I’d hoard all the beer or wine or whatever was available and put myself in that altered state that I preferred. Then one day, I was introduced to marijuana. And boy did that please me. That feeling of disconnection from reality – because my reality sucked – was something I’d craved, and I loved the attraction of it. By this time, I was 13. I had a wonderful home, and terrific parents, save the stepdad, but that wasn’t enough for me. I still didn’t feel as if I belonged, and I hated my life for reasons I didn’t even recognize. My dance with pot and alcohol continued at an ever-growing pace until the year I turned 15. The cancer that my mother had developed a year earlier finally took her life, and I couldn’t cope. Rather than lashing out at those I loved – although I must admit I wasn’t all that pleasant with them either – I turned all the anger and grief and bitterness toward myself. I hated my mom for leaving me and I despised God for taking her away. I began experimenting with harder drugs – LSD, cocaine, meth, whatever I could get my hands on. My world consisted of finding my next high, that next escape from misery. I’d become involved with some pretty shifty people and I wore whatever hat I needed to depending on what group I was with at the time. No one knew the real me, because not only did I refuse to show them – I didn’t know the real me either. When I was 17 I decided to leave my home and ended up on the streets of Houston before my family dragged me back. That happened 3 times that year. Sleeping under bridges, in the backs of cars, it didn’t matter so long as I was doing what I thought was best for me. My addiction progressed into the realm of relating with the dealers and dealing a bit myself (although that never worked, cause you can’t sell what you consume) and the endless cycle just never seemed to stop. At this point, I was started to get dissatisfied. I couldn’t pinpoint what was wrong, but I no longer felt that my lifestyle was giving me what I needed. I was miserable, and didn’t even know it. In May of 1999, a friend of mine had gotten into trouble on his job and was sent to an outpatient substance abuse clinic. He had to go to NA meetings as well, and hated every minute of it. He asked me to go along with him once, so he’d have someone “normal” with him (as if LOL). So I did, and that’s where my journey began. It took a few of those chance meetings to show me that something these people had connected with me. I recognized myself in them. But more importantly, they seemed genuinely, seriously happy, and I couldn’t understand why. Eventually my friend stopped going, but I didn’t. I ended up enrolling myself into a treatment program and started looking at what had all along been my true problem. Myself. I learned things about me that I never knew existed. I looked inward, for the very first time, and figured out that all these years of running to something else was just a way to run away from myself. I poured myself into Recovery and I did well. I helped others, chaired meetings, did everything I could to give back what was so freely given to me. But, something was off. In 2001, about 2 ½ years clean, my dad died. I was devastated. And rather than put into practice everything I’d learned, rather than leaning on my newly discovered friends, I chose to climb back into myself. I didn’t reach out, I didn’t talk about the grief, and it consumed me. I ended up going out with a guy from my past, and low and behold, the old Robin reared her ugly head and ended up drunk. Within a matter of 2 weeks, I ended up searching for the drugs that I’d worked so hard to stop using. By that time, I’d already begun working in my current field, so you can imagine how crazy this was. After a bit, my conscience took over, and the new Robin started trying to come back. I went to my sponsor and I confessed. She went with me to my supervisor and we discussed what I’d done. I tried to quit my job, but they wouldn’t let me. They had faith in me, when I wasn’t able to have faith in myself. I took about 5 months leave of absence from my job so I could work on me again. That experience taught me so many valuable lessons that I can’t even begin to list them. I learned that even though I’d been practicing a program of Recovery, I’d still not totally accepted that I was the center of the problem, that I was truly an addict. I’d become complacent you see. I’d started to realize that “hell, I’ve been clean this long, I’m a-okay!” But the most important one I learned was that no matter what, if I don’t do the work necessary my addiction is always ready to take hold of my life and run with it. I proved, without a shadow of a doubt, that it’s always right there, breathing down my neck, waiting for me to give in and go back down that road. It’s a road I never close the door on, because if I ever forget, then I’ll go back. That was 5 ½ years ago, and today I have more peace and more happiness and more serenity than I ever thought possible. Today, I have myself, and today, I have my family. Today, I know what it means to really and truly live, rather than just exist.
Carl44
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Testimonials

Post by Carl44 »

Mystery;641947 wrote: I'm not sure if there are any other recovering people here, but I'd been asked a while back if I'd post my own story, so I will, in the next post. It's an abbreviated version, because I'm choosing to leave out some things, but the highlights are there. Still long though, so I apologize for that. I do encourage others to post their own brushes with substance abuse, if they so choose. First and foremost, this is not about judgment. It's about sharing experiences, strengths, and hopes, in an effort to help those that still suffer. No offense is meant, as these words are mine.




post away :-6 :-6
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Bryn Mawr
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

Mystery;641948 wrote: My name is Robin, and I’m an addict. By the grace of God, I haven’t felt it necessary to take a drink or use a drug since January 19, 2002. This is my story.


Thank you, that has helped me to understand someone I could never get my head round.

Much admiration, both for posting your story and for having the strength to pull your life together.

:-6
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Mystery
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Post by Mystery »

Thank you Bryn, and I always mean to tell you, I love your selection of username!
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Bryn Mawr
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Post by Bryn Mawr »

Mystery;642033 wrote: Thank you Bryn, and I always mean to tell you, I love your selection of username!


Thank you - it's becoming as much a part of me as my given name now
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

Mystery;641947 wrote: I'm not sure if there are any other recovering people here, but I'd been asked a while back if I'd post my own story, so I will, in the next post. It's an abbreviated version, because I'm choosing to leave out some things, but the highlights are there. Still long though, so I apologize for that. I do encourage others to post their own brushes with substance abuse, if they so choose. First and foremost, this is not about judgment. It's about sharing experiences, strengths, and hopes, in an effort to help those that still suffer. No offense is meant, as these words are mine.


You are definitely not alone here. My name is Shel and I'm an alcoholic. I've been in recovery for 4 1/2 years. The first time I drank was New Years when I was 14. I dabbled in alcohol and drugs (pot & speed, I was too afraid of the other stuff) thru my teen years. When I left home, I always made sure I had something to drink if I wanted it. My last couple of years were terrible. The shakes when I woke up...always had to have 1 or 2 beers before I could get out of bed...my legs weren't stable enough. I went thru 3 rehabs and 4 detox's in 9 months. The difference with my last time in was that I knew I was going to die if I didn't get clean. I drank 56 beers in 24hrs before I went in for my last time...and I only blew a .10, that's how I knew my body was so used to it and was tolerating it so well that I would have had to go to something stronger if I didn't quit. I was inpatient for 34 days...and I finally got it. It'll be 5 years on 11/7/08. I still stay away from situations that could put me at risk, especially if I'm not feeling very strong. I know it's been quite sometime since you posted this, but I never have a problem sharing my story if it could help someone else. After being an active alcoholic for more than 20yrs I never felt better than after I quit. I've done a lot of counseling since then just to try to learn to feel again...I was always numb when I was drinking. It's tough, but it's worth it.
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Mystery
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Post by Mystery »

Hi Shelbell, thanks for sharing that! NO worries on how long it's been since I posted that, I've been away from FG for quite some time, caught up in RL issues!

I'm so glad you shared, though, cause it helps others who may be in need see that success is possible.

Congrats on the upcoming date!

Mystery,

aka Robin
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

Mystery;984414 wrote: Hi Shelbell, thanks for sharing that! NO worries on how long it's been since I posted that, I've been away from FG for quite some time, caught up in RL issues!

I'm so glad you shared, though, cause it helps others who may be in need see that success is possible.

Congrats on the upcoming date!

Mystery,

aka Robin


You're welcome Robin. I'm just one that hopes I can help at least one person with my story. I share my story with anyone that might need to hear it, or for people that may not understand it...which is many. I found your story encouraging because whether you are an alcoholic or addict, it's basically the same thing. I actually felt more comfortable in NA than in AA. What's funny is I got my clean date wrong, it's really 11/5....11/7 is the date my first grandson was born. :wah: I'm glad you're back and able to enjoy FG again. :)
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Chezzie
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Post by Chezzie »

Not sure if I should use these words but I enjoyed reading your story Robin. Takes a lot of guts and self belief to pour out your past like that.

I commend you (and shellbell) for having the strength and motivation to carry on being clean/sober.

There for the grace of god go I:-6



p.s. Hi Robin, glad you came back to the garden:-6
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

Chezzie;984542 wrote: Not sure if I should use these words but I enjoyed reading your story Robin. Takes a lot of guts and self belief to pour out your past like that.

I commend you (and shellbell) for having the strength and motivation to carry on being clean/sober.

There for the grace of god go I:-6



p.s. Hi Robin, glad you came back to the garden:-6


Thanks Chezzie, but what we did is what most people in recovery will do. It's kind of our way of giving back of what we were given...a new chance at life.:-6
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guppy
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Post by guppy »

I am just the opposite..the child of an alchoholic and the exwife of one. My sickness was just as bad for me as the active alcoholic..i enabled..used the addiction as the excuse to not be loved..to suffer..i rode the addiction but didnt actively do it. I finally chose several years ago to remove myself from that world..father, ex, anybody else that couldnt function without it. and by god..the world became a beautiful place to me. Just like the alchoholic, i had to remove myself from every single person i knew almost..and stood alone for a while..my dad quit drinking. my ex moved on and remarried a woman worse than he is..i have since met a wonderful man that has introduced me to a whole new world of nice functioning people. a world that i only imagined in my mind..i had no idea it really existed..but one i desperately wanted to know.



i went through all the phases of addiction. only worse.i tried to figure out how to stop the ex. i sought counseling for depression. went to alanon, aa, i went from trying to stop it, to being exremely angry, depressed, and finally acceptance..but not after years of sickness. I went from feeling helpless, to being empowered..but only after i started working on me..and me only..everything i knew fell away..i lost it all, but like someone said, when god shuts one door he opens a window..and the sunlight through that window is far brighter and happier than anything i was so damn scared of losing before. :-6
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guppy
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Post by guppy »

Mystery;641948 wrote: My name is Robin, and I’m an addict. By the grace of God, I haven’t felt it necessary to take a drink or use a drug since January 19, 2002. This is my story.



I had my first experience with mood altering substances early on. When I was a kid, my mother’s family rented a balcony at a local restaurant to watch the yearly Mardi Gras parade. This particular year, I think I was 8 or 9. My mom had ordered a drink, sprite with rum and a twist of lime. I decided it would be fun to trick her, so I drank it, and tipped the cup over the edge of the balcony to make it look like an accident. Only, the fun of that turned into the fun of the feeling I got. By the end of the afternoon, I’d “accidentally” consumed 3 or 4 of them, till my mom finally caught on. I tell you about this first experience, because I want to get across that my problems didn’t start with alcohol or drugs, my problems started inside. I never felt normal, I never felt all the way content, and I never knew why. That day, on that balcony, I found something that gave me a feeling I’d longed for, in my young mind – something I didn’t even understand. My regular relationship with drugs and/or alcohol started a couple of years down the road. I didn’t ease into anything. I found myself in a position of easy access to liquor and I ran with it. In the beginning, it started slowly, but in a matter of months, I was looking to swipe what I could, with the help of a stepbrother who’d already developed a taste for a life of addiction. Getting drunk became a regular occurrence for me. I’d drink my stepdad’s whiskey and fill the bottle with water (he was a chronic alcoholic, so he never noticed). When out with my sister or my friends I’d hoard all the beer or wine or whatever was available and put myself in that altered state that I preferred. Then one day, I was introduced to marijuana. And boy did that please me. That feeling of disconnection from reality – because my reality sucked – was something I’d craved, and I loved the attraction of it. By this time, I was 13. I had a wonderful home, and terrific parents, save the stepdad, but that wasn’t enough for me. I still didn’t feel as if I belonged, and I hated my life for reasons I didn’t even recognize. My dance with pot and alcohol continued at an ever-growing pace until the year I turned 15. The cancer that my mother had developed a year earlier finally took her life, and I couldn’t cope. Rather than lashing out at those I loved – although I must admit I wasn’t all that pleasant with them either – I turned all the anger and grief and bitterness toward myself. I hated my mom for leaving me and I despised God for taking her away. I began experimenting with harder drugs – LSD, cocaine, meth, whatever I could get my hands on. My world consisted of finding my next high, that next escape from misery. I’d become involved with some pretty shifty people and I wore whatever hat I needed to depending on what group I was with at the time. No one knew the real me, because not only did I refuse to show them – I didn’t know the real me either. When I was 17 I decided to leave my home and ended up on the streets of Houston before my family dragged me back. That happened 3 times that year. Sleeping under bridges, in the backs of cars, it didn’t matter so long as I was doing what I thought was best for me. My addiction progressed into the realm of relating with the dealers and dealing a bit myself (although that never worked, cause you can’t sell what you consume) and the endless cycle just never seemed to stop. At this point, I was started to get dissatisfied. I couldn’t pinpoint what was wrong, but I no longer felt that my lifestyle was giving me what I needed. I was miserable, and didn’t even know it. In May of 1999, a friend of mine had gotten into trouble on his job and was sent to an outpatient substance abuse clinic. He had to go to NA meetings as well, and hated every minute of it. He asked me to go along with him once, so he’d have someone “normal” with him (as if LOL). So I did, and that’s where my journey began. It took a few of those chance meetings to show me that something these people had connected with me. I recognized myself in them. But more importantly, they seemed genuinely, seriously happy, and I couldn’t understand why. Eventually my friend stopped going, but I didn’t. I ended up enrolling myself into a treatment program and started looking at what had all along been my true problem. Myself. I learned things about me that I never knew existed. I looked inward, for the very first time, and figured out that all these years of running to something else was just a way to run away from myself. I poured myself into Recovery and I did well. I helped others, chaired meetings, did everything I could to give back what was so freely given to me. But, something was off. In 2001, about 2 ½ years clean, my dad died. I was devastated. And rather than put into practice everything I’d learned, rather than leaning on my newly discovered friends, I chose to climb back into myself. I didn’t reach out, I didn’t talk about the grief, and it consumed me. I ended up going out with a guy from my past, and low and behold, the old Robin reared her ugly head and ended up drunk. Within a matter of 2 weeks, I ended up searching for the drugs that I’d worked so hard to stop using. By that time, I’d already begun working in my current field, so you can imagine how crazy this was. After a bit, my conscience took over, and the new Robin started trying to come back. I went to my sponsor and I confessed. She went with me to my supervisor and we discussed what I’d done. I tried to quit my job, but they wouldn’t let me. They had faith in me, when I wasn’t able to have faith in myself. I took about 5 months leave of absence from my job so I could work on me again. That experience taught me so many valuable lessons that I can’t even begin to list them. I learned that even though I’d been practicing a program of Recovery, I’d still not totally accepted that I was the center of the problem, that I was truly an addict. I’d become complacent you see. I’d started to realize that “hell, I’ve been clean this long, I’m a-okay!” But the most important one I learned was that no matter what, if I don’t do the work necessary my addiction is always ready to take hold of my life and run with it. I proved, without a shadow of a doubt, that it’s always right there, breathing down my neck, waiting for me to give in and go back down that road. It’s a road I never close the door on, because if I ever forget, then I’ll go back. That was 5 ½ years ago, and today I have more peace and more happiness and more serenity than I ever thought possible. Today, I have myself, and today, I have my family. Today, I know what it means to really and truly live, rather than just exist.




I am exremely proud and happy for you..may today be the day you hear the song of your soul..one day at a time...:-4
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

guppy;984577 wrote: I am just the opposite..the child of an alchoholic and the exwife of one. My sickness was just as bad for me as the active alcoholic..i enabled..used the addiction as the excuse to not be loved..to suffer..i rode the addiction but didnt actively do it. I finally chose several years ago to remove myself from that world..father, ex, anybody else that couldnt function without it. and by god..the world became a beautiful place to me. Just like the alchoholic, i had to remove myself from every single person i knew almost..and stood alone for a while..my dad quit drinking. my ex moved on and remarried a woman worse than he is..i have since met a wonderful man that has introduced me to a whole new world of nice functioning people. a world that i only imagined in my mind..i had no idea it really existed..but one i desperately wanted to know.



i went through all the phases of addiction. only worse.i tried to figure out how to stop the ex. i sought counseling for depression. went to alanon, aa, i went from trying to stop it, to being exremely angry, depressed, and finally acceptance..but not after years of sickness. I went from feeling helpless, to being empowered..but only after i started working on me..and me only..everything i knew fell away..i lost it all, but like someone said, when god shuts one door he opens a window..and the sunlight through that window is far brighter and happier than anything i was so damn scared of losing before. :-6


Thanks for sharing this guppy, you may have opened some eyes on the way any addiction can affect the rest of the family. You did a great job of explaining the steps and the emotions that come from loving someone in addiction...and the way to remove yourself. No addict can get clean without wanting it, no matter how hard anyone else tries to help them. :-6
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guppy
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Post by guppy »

shelbell;984600 wrote: Thanks for sharing this guppy, you may have opened some eyes on the way any addiction can affect the rest of the family. You did a great job of explaining the steps and the emotions that come from loving someone in addiction...and the way to remove yourself. No addict can get clean without wanting it, no matter how hard anyone else tries to help them. :-6


Thanks Shelbell..the part i couldnt get for so long was..they might have been addicted to a substance.i was addicted to the people addicted to the substance..i was never helpless..i had choices..i just refused to see them. I was to scared to see them..to make the right choices for me..to change my life..to stop hiding in someone else. so our paths are not so different are they? :-4
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

guppy;984623 wrote: Thanks Shelbell..the part i couldnt get for so long was..they might have been addicted to a substance.i was addicted to the people addicted to the substance..i was never helpless..i had choices..i just refused to see them. I was to scared to see them..to make the right choices for me..to change my life..to stop hiding in someone else. so our paths are not so different are they? :-4


No they're not guppy...most non-addicts just can't grasp that there is nothing they can do for their loved one except tough love and stand by it. Most addicts don't realize that they even have a problem...I didn't. I'm so glad you got the help to get on with your life and that you are happy now. :):-4
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Mystery
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Post by Mystery »

Shellbell - I recovered in NA, and while I do attend some AA groups, I will always prefer the more open-minded people I found in NA ;) (I don't say that to degrade, AA, it's just got to do with personal preferences, IMO)

Chezzie - thank you :) The words you used were perfect. We have saying in recovery - "to keep what we have, we have to give it away". It is our responsibility to share our experiences, strengths, and hopes in a desire to hopefully influence and help others like us :)

Guppy - Codependency is one of the most difficult things to get away from! I suffered with that as well, to an extent, and I can tell you it was just as difficult to let go of that as it was my addiction. I'm proud of you and your accomplishments. You're living proof that recovery from the affects of addiction on collateral lives is possible ;)

I can also say that working with codependent clients in my job is sometimes a bigger challenge. That cycle is just as vicious and all-consuming as that of addiction, yet it's harder for the person to identify because there are few "outward" symptoms.
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Oscar Namechange
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

I find this all very interesting.

What i can not get my head around is my absolute hatred for alcohol and drugs even from a very early age.

My mother never drank nor did my father except for a tot of scotch as a treat once in a blue moon. So, i grew up without any of my family dependent on alcohol or drugs so i can't say my aversion stemmed from seeing a family member in the grip of addiction.

I can fully understand the addiction, i don't have trouble with that as in adult life, events led me to be prescribed sleeping pills and sedatives, which i became addicted to. One of them, Diazapam had such an effect on me that i just cut off my prescription one day. Not being an addict before, i was alarmed to find myself suffering withdrawal symptoms. I saw the Diazapam as 'evil' and it made me more determined to never take them again and get them out of my system, which i did.

What i find odd, is that as one finds addiction so easily, another, like myself seems to be born with not only a natural aversion to alcohol and drugs, but to the point of having a hatred for them. :confused::confused:
At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. R.L. Binyon
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shelbell
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Post by shelbell »

oscar;1037353 wrote: I find this all very interesting.

What i can not get my head around is my absolute hatred for alcohol and drugs even from a very early age.

My mother never drank nor did my father except for a tot of scotch as a treat once in a blue moon. So, i grew up without any of my family dependent on alcohol or drugs so i can't say my aversion stemmed from seeing a family member in the grip of addiction.

I can fully understand the addiction, i don't have trouble with that as in adult life, events led me to be prescribed sleeping pills and sedatives, which i became addicted to. One of them, Diazapam had such an effect on me that i just cut off my prescription one day. Not being an addict before, i was alarmed to find myself suffering withdrawal symptoms. I saw the Diazapam as 'evil' and it made me more determined to never take them again and get them out of my system, which i did.

What i find odd, is that as one finds addiction so easily, another, like myself seems to be born with not only a natural aversion to alcohol and drugs, but to the point of having a hatred for them. :confused::confused:


Be thankful Oscar...be very grateful. Some people just have an aversion to all drugs, including alcohol, so you are not alone in your feelings. I say good for you...you've been given a gift, whether you understand it or not. :):-6
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binbag
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Post by binbag »

Hello everyone, binbag here. :)

I'm a newbie in the Forums and delighted to discover this recovery thread.

I got hooked on alcohol at a young age, it was dreadful but, I've been sober thirty eight years now.

Each of us recovering alcoholics has a story to tell and each person's story is every bit as important as the next person's, and that includes the one who is just thirty eight hours sober, there ain't no difference.



I was asked to write my testimony for a Christian web site just over ten years ago. The site is closed now, perhaps they all ran away after they read the testimony. lol

Anyway, I kept my story on disc with the intention of rewriting it as I always felt it was amateurish. On the other hand, it's the first and only time I've written about myself and I can't make up my mind whether to just leave it as it is or re-write it. Thing is, I wrote it with the emotions I had those ten years ago, if I were re-write it I may be tempted to change bits of it here and there, that's something I don't want to do.

If I'm going to send it in I'd need to edit it anyway as there's intimate references to a church I attended.

In the meantime and until I decide what to do, here's the intro.....

Hope it may be of some interest.



It was an April morning, and as I briefly looked out

of the window I noticed it was cloudy and raining.

However it was warm and cosy here inside the

old large country mansion house.

I paused for a moment, at the bottom of the broad

sweeping marble staircase with it's beautiful maroon

carpet, black enamelled railings and highly polished

mahogany banister that lead up to the oak panelled

landing, enriched with stunning carved bedroom doors,

interspersed with incredible large gilt edged oil paintings.

Just as I was about to walk up the stairway, the first step

towards the beginning of a brand new chapter in my life.

I turned and looked at the beautiful young lady standing

by my side, her arm folded in mine.

She turned and gazed at me and gave my arm a re-assuring

squeeze.

However, the beautiful young lady standing there giving me

reassurance was not my darling wife, but the nurse that was

assigned to be in charge of me in this alcoholic unit of the

psychiatric hospital.

You see I had attempted suicide for the third time, and my

doctor had me signed in to this alcoholic unit of the hospital

for help and for my own safety.

Well, all that was thirty eight years ago this past April,

and finding myself in that hospital was the final breaking

point.

I had reached my own personal Hades, and it was just what

I needed to shock me out of looking at the world through a

whiskey bottle.

Now began the long and winding road towards sobriety.........

--------------------

Till the next time,

Fight the good fight, and keep smiling.

binbag.
[FONT=Arial]Just above the clouds

the sun is always shining.

[/FONT]
LeeSung
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:33 pm

Testimonials

Post by LeeSung »

Hi LeeSung here and this is my story. I was an alcoholic. It started since I broke up with my long-time girlfriend. I felt so depress because she was my first love. I thought my whole world crash during those painful days. I met some people at the bar and they've influenced me.. drugs, alcohol and girls. It did lessen my pain but only for a bit of time. And I was very wrong. The time that I hit the bottom was when I saw my mom crying and begging to change myself. It pierced my heart and I decided to quit my addictions.Through online, I managed to search for alcohol rehabilitation programs that could help me start a new life. A relative in Wisconsin is generous to give me a helping hand and allow me to stay with him so I can avoid distractions. I started believing in myself which enable me to bypass every challenges on my recovery. I've been sober for months now and day by day, I try my best to live a happier and healthier life.
Matt50
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 9:23 pm

Testimonials

Post by Matt50 »

Way to go Leesung! You made a right decision to live a life away from the world of addiction. Being in addiction give us pain but as we start to realize that we were wrong and learned to forgive ourselves, a second chance start to rise. Reward yourself from your achievements. You're very bless to have your cousin in Wisconsin support you on your journey to sobriety and I'm very glad to know that alcohol rehabilitation programs worked for you. Addiction can be a great teacher. Let's forget the past and move on with our lives. Goodluck!
LeeSung
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:33 pm

Testimonials

Post by LeeSung »

Thanks Matt for your support.. I do reward myself for every achievements I attain and so far being sober is my greatest achievement.
Matt50
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 9:23 pm

Testimonials

Post by Matt50 »

No problem Lee. My therapist at Hope Addiction Treatment Services told me the same thing that being sober is my greatest achievement.

I feel more at ease knowing that I am stronger to face any challenges in my life.
LeeSung
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:33 pm

Testimonials

Post by LeeSung »

way to go matt. i know you are strong enough to face those challenges in your life.you have a good therapist. my friend told me about Hope and Care Rehabilitation i will check it later.

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