Acorn warning

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valerie
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Acorn warning

Post by valerie »

Since it is about this time of year...



Warning! Acorns

This little seed of the mighty oak may hold potential dangers for your pet.

This time of year, our parks and yards are randomly strewn with acorns. The squirrels are busy gathering and hiding them away, the kids are fitting them into slingshots, and the dogs are idly chewing on them. Probably one of the most well-known and common of the North American seed nuts, the acorn also poses hidden dangers for our companion animals.

In the northern hemisphere there are approximately 500 different species of oak, varying from small shrub-like plants to large trees. Here in Texas alone, we have 39 species and many variations. Across the US, the oak enjoys wide distribution, and their habitat ranges from dry rocky slopes to wet bottomlands to heavy sands.

The leaves vary widely from species to species, however they are generally deciduous and stemmed. The fruit of the oak is one seeded, with the seed being encased in a shell forming a nut or acorn. The nut sits in a cup which may encase the whole seed, or may simply form the familiar cap. Because of the wide variation in appearance, you should consult a local botanical guide when unable to positively identify particular plants.



Oak toxicity is well known in the livestock industry, primarily for its effects on cattle, sheep, goats, and horses. In fact in the cattle industry, there is a common term for birth defects caused by the mother's ingestion of large quantities of oak. Offspring affected by "oak calf syndrome" are usually born with shortened limbs, abnormal hooves, and misshapen heads.

The mature leaves of the oak are not toxic, however the buds, flowers, young stems and acorns all contain hazardous levels of the primary toxins. The actual levels are dependent on the species of oak, the time of year, and the climatic conditions during the year in question.

The primary toxins found in the plant material are tannins and phenols. These compounds attack proteins they come in contact with possibly causing ulcers and bleeding of the mouth lining, the esophagus, and the intestines. This may be demonstrated by bloody or dark diarrhea. Additionally, the toxins are converted in the digestive tract where they may enter the blood stream causing hepatic (liver) and renal (kidney) damage and in extreme cases failure.

The symptoms are usually delayed, in some cases a week after ingestion. These signs may include depression, constipation or diarrhea (both accompanied by blood), abdominal pain, rough coat, a period of frequent urination followed by no urination.

The lethal dose for dogs is not known, for cattle it is approximately 6% of the animal's body weight. If you have a 40 pound dog, that's almost 2½ pounds of acorns. However the literature does not state how long a period of time this quantity could be consumed over and still be lethal. As a precaution, keep all areas available to your dog free of acorns and downed oak vegetation. Be especially vigilant after periods of extreme wind or strong storms when there may be more plant material on the ground.

If you suspect that your dog has eaten a large quantity of acorns, and it has been an hour or less since ingestion try to induce vomiting with hydrogen peroxide. Play it safe and follow up with a dose of charcoal (such as toxiban). In extreme cases, an emergency trip to the clinic may be warranted.
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valerie
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Acorn warning

Post by valerie »

Bump.
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RedGlitter
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Acorn warning

Post by RedGlitter »

Hey thanks, Val. I didn't know oak was a problem! Good info.
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Chezzie
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Acorn warning

Post by Chezzie »

Thanks Valerie, I wasnt aware that acorns were a problem either...Thanks for the heads up hun:-6
justnonsense
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Acorn warning

Post by justnonsense »

Oak makes nice furniture too.

But I'm not sure about the acorns.
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KB.
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Acorn warning

Post by KB. »

I like the taste of acorns.
Life ain't linear.
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Chezzie
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Acorn warning

Post by Chezzie »

KB.;766980 wrote: I like the taste of acorns.



didnt know you could eat them, full of tannins aren't they, do you have to cook them a special way to remove the tannins first?

p.s. what they taste like....please dont reply chicken:wah:
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Helen
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Acorn warning

Post by Helen »

where i used to live in the new forest in hampshire, the farmers turn their pigs out to eat acorns as they do untold damage, if eaten by the ponies that roam the land.

the worst time for this is october/november time so the worst is over now.
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valerie
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Acorn warning

Post by valerie »

It is over in some places... but take a look at the date on the OP!!



We have wild turkeys here who feast on them... and deer like them

apparently, too.
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KB.
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Acorn warning

Post by KB. »

You leach the tannins out but it depends on the acorn as to how much tannin it will have. Most of the ones in my folk's yard (where I get them) aren't that bitter so roasted they are just like I want them.

I have made bread and pancakes with the ground acorns before.

It was something we learned in Boy Scouts for survival training. I'm a weirdo though. I like roasted grasshoppers and crickets too. So most of the stuff the other guys were gagging on I was enjoying.

Hard to describe what they taste like. They are bitter but it has a warm flavor I guess would be the easiest way to put it. When we would pick up pecans and walnuts from the yard I always got acorns as well.
Life ain't linear.
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SuzyB
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Acorn warning

Post by SuzyB »

My Mum has oak trees at the back of the garden, the amount of squirels filling their faces with the nuts! I always seem to lose my balance on them :rolleyes:
I am nobody..nobody is perfect...therefore I must be Perfect!





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Carolly
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Acorn warning

Post by Carolly »

Thankyou for this info Val.Like my thread it helps hopefully some Dog owners.We are never to old to learn thats for sure;)
Women are bitchy and predictable ...men are not and that's the key to knowing the truth.
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Chezzie
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Acorn warning

Post by Chezzie »

KB.;766998 wrote: You leach the tannins out but it depends on the acorn as to how much tannin it will have. Most of the ones in my folk's yard (where I get them) aren't that bitter so roasted they are just like I want them.

I have made bread and pancakes with the ground acorns before.

It was something we learned in Boy Scouts for survival training. I'm a weirdo though. I like roasted grasshoppers and crickets too. So most of the stuff the other guys were gagging on I was enjoying.

Hard to describe what they taste like. They are bitter but it has a warm flavor I guess would be the easiest way to put it. When we would pick up pecans and walnuts from the yard I always got acorns as well.



sound similar to chestnuts then.........I have wonderful memories of chestnut picking then all gathering round my mother while we roasted them...delicious:p
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Helen
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Acorn warning

Post by Helen »

Chezzie;767007 wrote: sound similar to chestnuts then.........I have wonderful memories of chestnut picking then all gathering round my mother while we roasted them...delicious:p



when my kids were small we'd often go out, depending on the time of year of course, for mushrooms, blackberries, apples, chestnuts, hazel nuts etc. you'd walk past peoples gates and there'd be boxes of excess veg and fruit with " help yourself " writen on them.................. those days are long gone now :(
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BTS
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Acorn warning

Post by BTS »

Oops Wrong thread, but thanks Val. will keep this in mind with my dags.



Anyways, I thought you were warning us about the ACORN and project vote voter fraud that is going on right now.

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php? ... s&id=28965
"If America Was A Tree, The Left Would Root For The Termites...Greg Gutfeld."

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